Sunday November 17, 2019

Little Sleep Associated with Greater Risk of Having Low BMD in Women: Researchers

The study was published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

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Soothing colours, right scent aid sound sleep. Pixabay

Getting too little sleep is linked with a higher risk of having low bone mineral density (BMD) and developing osteoporosis, researchers have warned.

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bone weakening increases the risk of a broken bone.

“Our study suggests that sleep may negatively impact bone health, adding to the list of the negative health impacts of poor sleep,” said the study lead author Heather Ochs-Balcom, from the University at Buffalo in the US.

In the study of 11,084 postmenopausal women, those who reported sleeping five hours or less per night had lower BMD at all four sites assessed — whole body, total hip, neck, and spine — compared with women who reported sleeping seven hours per night.

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Don’t consume caffeinated drinks less than six hours before you go to sleep. Pixabay

After adjustments, women reporting five hours or less per night had 22 per cent and 63 per cent higher risks of experiencing low bone mass and osteoporosis of the hip, respectively.

Similar results were seen with the spine.

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“I hope that it can also serve as a reminder to strive for the recommended seven or more hours of sleep per night for our physical and mental health,” Ochs-Balcom said.

The study was published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (IANS)

Next Story

Keto Diet May Help Combat the Flu Virus: Research

When mice were bred without the gene that codes for gamma delta T cells, the ketogenic diet provided no protection against the influenza virus

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Keto, Meals, Apartment
If you’re craving pancakes but you’re following a keto diet, almond flour pancakes are a perfect solution. Pixabay

A ketogenic diet, which includes meat, fish, poultry and non-starchy vegetables, may help combat the flu virus, suggests new research.

This diet regimen activates a subset of T cells in the lungs not previously associated with the immune system’s response to influenza, enhancing mucus production from airway cells that can effectively trap the virus, said the study published in the journal Science Immunology.

“This was a totally unexpected finding,” said co-senior author Akiko Iwasaki, Professor at Yale University in the US.

The researchers found that mice fed a ketogenic diet were better able to combat the flu virus than mice fed food high in carbohydrates.

CDC, Flu, Vaccine
The researchers found that mice fed a ketogenic diet were better able to combat the flu virus than mice fed food high in carbohydrates. Pixabay

Specifically, the researchers found that the ketogenic diet triggered the release of gamma delta T cells, immune system cells that produce mucus in the cell linings of the lung — while the high-carbohydrate diet did not.

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When mice were bred without the gene that codes for gamma delta T cells, the ketogenic diet provided no protection against the influenza virus.

“This study shows that the way the body burns fat to produce ketone bodies from the food we eat can fuel the immune system to fight flu infection,” said co-senior author Visha Deep Dixit, Professor at Yale University. (IANS)