Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
"Artistes, organisers, promoters, musicians, technicians - so many of them don't know when they will be able to do an event or earn anything", Armaan Malik said.

Singer Armaan Malik says concerts used to fuel his business, which has been hit massively due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The live business has taken a massive hit. Artistes, organisers, promoters, musicians, technicians – so many of them don’t know when they will be able to do an event or earn anything. It was their main source of income,” Armaan told IANS.


Follow NewsGram on Quora Space to get answers to all your questions.

“For me, too, concerts were the main thing that used to fuel my business. I had two major college festival gigs that got cancelled. But it’s more important to be safe and I wouldn’t do a show until we know Covid-19 is on its way out. I’ve done selective digital concerts during this time and even though virtual performances are the only readily available alternative at the moment, they don’t feel as good as an actual live performance,” he added.


Armaan’s popular numbers include “Tu hawa”, “Naina”, “Main hoon hero tera”, etc. Pinterest

Armaan’s popular numbers include “Tu hawa”, “Naina”, “Main hoon hero tera”, “Hua hain aaj pehli baar”, “Sau aasmaan”, and “Dil mein tum ho” among others.

Also Read: 3 Bodybuilding Tools To Help You Get Ripped

The singer shared that the pandemic has made people realise that the internet is going to be “the main marketplace”.

“No one can escape it. For musicians, it has become imperative to be active and engaging with their audiences on various different social platforms. Anyone who doesn’t embrace the digital age could be left back. For people who belong to the old-school of thought, this might be a scary change, but you have to accept the change to move forward,” added the singer, who is also a part of Vh1 Sound Nation League 2020. (IANS)


Popular

wikimedia commons

Tenali Raman, courtier to Krishnadevaraya (A portrait)


Tenali Ramakrishna, or Tenali Raman as he is more popularly known is Birbal's equivalent in South India. A court jester and a scholar exuding great wisdom, Tenali Raman was known as one of the greatest courtiers in King Krishnadevaraya's court.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Pixabay

Battle at Lanka as mentioned in the Ramayana

It must be noted that different religions and societies in Southeast Asia have alternative narratives of Ramayana, one of the greatest epic.

Here are some of the versions of Ramayana!

Keep Reading Show less
Virendra Singh Gosain, Hindustan Times

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people

When a baby is born in an Indian household-they invite hijra to shower the newborn with their blessings for their blessings confer fertility, prosperity, and long life on the child. But when that child grows up we teach them to avert their eyes when a group of hijras passes by, we pass on the behaviour of treating hijras as lesser humans to our children. Whenever a child raises a question related to gender identity or sexuality they are shushed down. We're taught to believe that anything "deviant" and outside of traditional cis-heteronormativity is something to be ashamed of. This mentality raises anxious, scared queer adults who're ashamed of their own identity, and adults who bully people for "queer behaviour".

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people. They worship the Hindu goddess of chastity and fertility, Bahuchara Mata. Most hijras, but not all, choose to undergo a castration ceremony known as "nirvana" in which they remove their male genitalia as an offering to their goddess. The whole community is vibrant with hundreds of people with hundreds of ways of expression, the true identity of a hijra is complex and unique to each individual. In India, hijras prefer to refer to themselves as Kinner/Kinnar as it means the mythological beings who excel at singing and dancing.

Keep reading... Show less