Saturday April 20, 2019
Home India Facts About L...

Facts About Lonar Lake That Will Leave You Awestruck

Lake is said to be one of Maharashtra’s best-kept secrets as not many people know about this magnificent phenomenon

0
//
The Lonar lake is one of its kinds, not only in India but on the planet, which kept it pretty well-preserved for thousands of years. Wikimedia Commons
The Lonar lake is one of its kinds, not only in India but on the planet, which kept it pretty well-preserved for thousands of years. Wikimedia Commons
  • The Lonar Lake is located at Lonar in Buldhana district, Maharashtra, India
  • The lake was created by a meteor impact during the Pleistocene Epoch
  • Lonar Lake is a notified National Geo-heritage Monument saline soda lake and lies in a basalt impact structure

The Mother Nature is full of natural wonders, from hills and valleys to rivers and oceans, from the hundreds and thousands of species of plants and animals to the wind, breeze and sky, nature is what makes this world worth living in.

The Lonar Lake that is saline and alkaline at the same time- this unique combination makes the lake pretty unique. It is located at Lonar in Buldhana district, Maharashtra, India. That is something that you don’t really see on a fairly regular basis and has been subject to scientific studies for a very long time. To know more about it, many geologists, archaeologists, naturalists and astronomers have published studies of various aspects of this Lonar Crater Lake ecosystem. The lake is also known as ‘Lonar Sarovar.’

Also Read: Facts That Will Amaze You About Kerala’s Jatayu National Park

Lonar Lake Mystery

This peculiar lake is one of its kinds, not only in India but on the planet, which kept it pretty well-preserved for thousands of years. It was created by a meteor impact during the Pleistocene Epoch and it is the only known hypervelocity impact crater in basaltic rock anywhere on Earth. Lonar Lake is said to be one of Maharashtra’s best-kept secrets as not many people know about this magnificent phenomenon.

The Lonar Lake was formed when a blazing ball of fire crashed into the earth at an estimated speed of 90,000 km per hour. Wikimedia Commons
The Lonar Lake was formed when a blazing ball of fire crashed into the earth at an estimated speed of 90,000 km per hour. Wikimedia Commons

The Lonar Lake mystery still perplexes many. The estimated age of the lake is said to be a topic of contention. Generally, the Lonar Lake is believed to be 50,000 incredibly years old but according to some studies, gives an age of 570,000 years. Geological Society of India has conducted extensive studies of the site. Later in 2007, the biological nitrogen fixation nature of Lonar Lake was also discovered.

The circular depression bears a saline water lake in its central portion. It was formed when a blazing ball of fire crashed into the earth at an estimated speed of 90,000 km per hour. This hit resulted into eruption and spewing molten rock to create a magnificent crest on the rim. With the gentle passage of time, green cover took over in the surrounding of the lake and a perennial stream transformed the crater into a tranquil, emerald green lake.

Also Read: Nalanda University: 5 Lesser-Known Facts About The Ancient University

Lonar Lake Tourism

The land-locked water body is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary with a unique ecology that is vastly different from the surrounding flat landscape and supports micro-organisms rarely found elsewhere on earth. At first, it was believed that the lake was of volcanic origins but further studies proved that the lake was sitting in a crater formed by extraterrestrial impact. The presence of maskelynite and the planar deformation features are not part of volcanic origins. Thus, it leads to the abandoning of volcanic origin theory.

The land-locked water body is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary. Wikimedia Commons
The land-locked water body is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary. Wikimedia Commons

Here 10 facts about Lonar lake, which will help you to dwell more of its origins and unique features.

  1. Lonar Lake is a notified National Geo-heritage Monument saline soda lake and lies in a basalt impact structure
  2. The lake has a diameter of 1.2 kilometres (3,900 ft) and is about 137 metres (449 ft) below the crater rim.
  3. The crater’s oval shape indicates that the asteroid or the comet had hit India’s Deccan Traps basaltic formation as an angle of 35 degrees to 40 degrees.
  4. The lake is surrounded by eight ancient temples dating all the way back to the 6th century to the 12th century from the Chalukya and the Yadava period. Many of the temples here have perplexing carvings on the walls that resemble the world-famous group of temples in Khajuraho. Unfortunately, apart from Kamalaja Devi Temple, all others are in ruins.
  5. Even the lake is mentioned in historic tales from the Ashoka Empire, the Chalukya Dynasty, and all the way to the Mughals and Nizams.
  6. It was in the early 19th century in 1823, when the first time a European visited the lake, British officer, JE Alexander.
  7. According to NASA, the crater’s volcanic basalt makes Lonar a well similar to that of impact craters on the surface of the Moon. Moreover, the recently discovered bacterial strain on the lake’s crater site resembles the one found on Mars.
  8. Due to high amounts of soda in it, it makes it impossible for any type of vegetation to grow here.
  9. Still, the lake is considered as the youngest and best-preserved impact crater formed in basalt rock and is the only of its kind on earth.
  10. To measure the age of lake, there were different methods used. One was thermoluminescence analysis which revealed that the age of the lake to be 52,000 years old with a spread of 6000 years correction on either side. That simply puts the age of the Lonar Crater Lake to be anywhere between 46,000 years and 58,000 years. On the other hand, the second method was Argon-Argon dating which says that the crater was formed some 570,000 years ago with a spread of 47,000 years correction on either side.
  11. The Lonar Lake has been mentioned in ‘Skanda Purana’ which is the longest of the 18 Mahapuranas that gives insights on the various pilgrim centres in the country.
  12. The crater impact also makes it a place for maskelynite. Maskelynite is a kind of naturally occurring glass that is only formed by extremely high-velocity impacts.
    According to NASA, the crater’s volcanic basalt makes Lonar a well similar to that of impact craters on the surface of the Moon. Wikimedia Commons
    According to NASA, the crater’s volcanic basalt makes Lonar a well similar to that of impact craters on the surface of the Moon. Wikimedia Commons

    The visitors have to trek through the dense forest to reach this marvellous location. One can experience wide varieties of flora and fauna over here. Birds like the Black-winged Stilts, Brahminy ducks and Bay Weavers among others can be spotted here regularly. Even Bats, Langur, Gazelles and Chikaras makes a visit here regularly.

    A series of a low hill around the crater basin sits with an 8 kilometres circumference on the top. The side area of the basin has a steep rise of 75 degrees and is covered with multiple rings of trees. Each ring of the tree is made up of a specific species of tree. For instance, the first and outermost ring is of date palms.

Next Story

Student Project into Space, NASA Comes Up With Chicago Planetarium

As the NASA-owned, Northrop Grumann-developed Antares rocket successfully blasted off from the coast of Virginia on April 17, it wasn’t just making a resupply mission to the International Space Station.

0
Earth
“Our main goal was to see if the ozone layer is getting thinner and by how much, and if there is different parts of the Earth’s atmosphere getting thinner because of the pollution and greenhouse gases, Pixabay

 

College student Fatima Guerra, 19, will be the first to admit, she’s into some really nerdy stuff.

“Like, up there nerdy.”

“Way up there nerdy,” she says. “All the way up into space.”

Guerra is an astronomer in training, involved since a high school internship with a small project at the Adler Planetarium, with big goals.

“Our main goal was to see if the ozone layer is getting thinner and by how much, and if there is different parts of the Earth’s atmosphere getting thinner because of the pollution and greenhouse gases,” she told VOA from the laboratory at the Adler where she often works.

FILE - Apollo 13 crew members Commander Captain James A. Lovell, Jr., right, and Lunar Module Pilot Fred W. Haise pose for a photo during a 40th Anniversary reunion of the moon mission at the Adler Planetarium, April 12, 2010, in Chicago.
Apollo 13 crew members Commander Captain James A. Lovell, Jr., right, and Lunar Module Pilot Fred W. Haise pose for a photo during a 40th Anniversary reunion of the moon mission at the Adler Planetarium, April 12, 2010, in Chicago. VOA

Coding ThinSat

Data that sheds light on those circumstances is gathered by a small electronic device called “ThinSat” designed to orbit the Earth. It is developed not by high-paid engineers and software programmers, but by Chicago-area students like Guerra.

“We focused on coding the different parts of the sensors that the ThinSat is composed of. So, we coded so that it can measure light intensity, pressure.”

“This stuff is very nerdy,” Jesus Garcia admits with a chuckle.

“What we hope to accomplish is look at Earth from space as if it was the very first exoplanet that we have. So, imagine that we are looking at the very first images from a very distant planet.”

As a systems engineer, Garcia oversees the work of the students developing ThinSat for the Adler’s Far Horizon’s Project, which he outlines “bring all types of students, volunteers and our staff to develop projects, engineering projects, that allow us to answer scientific questions.”

Garcia says the students he works with on the project cross national, racial and cultural divides to work toward a common goal.

“Here at the Adler, we have students who are minorities who have been faced with challenges of not having opportunities presented to them,” he said. “And here we are presenting a mission where they are collaborating with us scientists and engineers on our first mission that is going into space.”

Rocket carries project into space

As the NASA-owned, Northrop Grumann-developed Antares rocket successfully blasted off from the coast of Virginia on April 17, it wasn’t just making a resupply mission to the International Space Station.

On board was ThinSat, the culmination of work by many at the Adler, including Guerra, who joined the Far Horizons team as a high school requirement that ended up becoming much more.

“A requirement can become a life-changing opportunity, and you don’t even know it,” she told VOA. “It’s really exciting to see, or to know, especially, that my work is going to go up into space and help in the scientific world.”

Daughter of immigrants

It is also exciting for her parents, immigrants from Guatemala, who can boast that their daughter is one of the few who can claim to have built a satellite orbiting the Earth.

“I told them it might become a worldwide type of news, and I’m going to be a part of it. And they were really proud. And they were calling my family over there and saying, ‘She might be on TV.’ And it’s something they really feel a part of me about,” Guerra said.

Also Read: ‘Big Steps To Reduce Carbon Emission’ Apple Expects Cooperation With China on Clean Energy

Long after the data compiled by ThinSat is complete, Guerro will still have a place in history as a member of a team that put the first satellite developed by a private planetarium into space.

She says her friends don’t think that’s nerdy at all.

“It’s cool, because it’s interesting to see that something so nerdy is actually going to work, and is going to go up into something so important,” she said. (VOA)