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Facts About Lonar Lake That Will Leave You Awestruck

Lake is said to be one of Maharashtra’s best-kept secrets as not many people know about this magnificent phenomenon

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The Lonar lake is one of its kinds, not only in India but on the planet, which kept it pretty well-preserved for thousands of years. Wikimedia Commons
The Lonar lake is one of its kinds, not only in India but on the planet, which kept it pretty well-preserved for thousands of years. Wikimedia Commons
  • The Lonar Lake is located at Lonar in Buldhana district, Maharashtra, India
  • The lake was created by a meteor impact during the Pleistocene Epoch
  • Lonar Lake is a notified National Geo-heritage Monument saline soda lake and lies in a basalt impact structure

The Mother Nature is full of natural wonders, from hills and valleys to rivers and oceans, from the hundreds and thousands of species of plants and animals to the wind, breeze and sky, nature is what makes this world worth living in.

The Lonar Lake that is saline and alkaline at the same time- this unique combination makes the lake pretty unique. It is located at Lonar in Buldhana district, Maharashtra, India. That is something that you don’t really see on a fairly regular basis and has been subject to scientific studies for a very long time. To know more about it, many geologists, archaeologists, naturalists and astronomers have published studies of various aspects of this Lonar Crater Lake ecosystem. The lake is also known as ‘Lonar Sarovar.’

Also Read: Facts That Will Amaze You About Kerala’s Jatayu National Park

Lonar Lake Mystery

This peculiar lake is one of its kinds, not only in India but on the planet, which kept it pretty well-preserved for thousands of years. It was created by a meteor impact during the Pleistocene Epoch and it is the only known hypervelocity impact crater in basaltic rock anywhere on Earth. Lonar Lake is said to be one of Maharashtra’s best-kept secrets as not many people know about this magnificent phenomenon.

The Lonar Lake was formed when a blazing ball of fire crashed into the earth at an estimated speed of 90,000 km per hour. Wikimedia Commons
The Lonar Lake was formed when a blazing ball of fire crashed into the earth at an estimated speed of 90,000 km per hour. Wikimedia Commons

The Lonar Lake mystery still perplexes many. The estimated age of the lake is said to be a topic of contention. Generally, the Lonar Lake is believed to be 50,000 incredibly years old but according to some studies, gives an age of 570,000 years. Geological Society of India has conducted extensive studies of the site. Later in 2007, the biological nitrogen fixation nature of Lonar Lake was also discovered.

The circular depression bears a saline water lake in its central portion. It was formed when a blazing ball of fire crashed into the earth at an estimated speed of 90,000 km per hour. This hit resulted into eruption and spewing molten rock to create a magnificent crest on the rim. With the gentle passage of time, green cover took over in the surrounding of the lake and a perennial stream transformed the crater into a tranquil, emerald green lake.

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Lonar Lake Tourism

The land-locked water body is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary with a unique ecology that is vastly different from the surrounding flat landscape and supports micro-organisms rarely found elsewhere on earth. At first, it was believed that the lake was of volcanic origins but further studies proved that the lake was sitting in a crater formed by extraterrestrial impact. The presence of maskelynite and the planar deformation features are not part of volcanic origins. Thus, it leads to the abandoning of volcanic origin theory.

The land-locked water body is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary. Wikimedia Commons
The land-locked water body is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary. Wikimedia Commons

Here 10 facts about Lonar lake, which will help you to dwell more of its origins and unique features.

  1. Lonar Lake is a notified National Geo-heritage Monument saline soda lake and lies in a basalt impact structure
  2. The lake has a diameter of 1.2 kilometres (3,900 ft) and is about 137 metres (449 ft) below the crater rim.
  3. The crater’s oval shape indicates that the asteroid or the comet had hit India’s Deccan Traps basaltic formation as an angle of 35 degrees to 40 degrees.
  4. The lake is surrounded by eight ancient temples dating all the way back to the 6th century to the 12th century from the Chalukya and the Yadava period. Many of the temples here have perplexing carvings on the walls that resemble the world-famous group of temples in Khajuraho. Unfortunately, apart from Kamalaja Devi Temple, all others are in ruins.
  5. Even the lake is mentioned in historic tales from the Ashoka Empire, the Chalukya Dynasty, and all the way to the Mughals and Nizams.
  6. It was in the early 19th century in 1823, when the first time a European visited the lake, British officer, JE Alexander.
  7. According to NASA, the crater’s volcanic basalt makes Lonar a well similar to that of impact craters on the surface of the Moon. Moreover, the recently discovered bacterial strain on the lake’s crater site resembles the one found on Mars.
  8. Due to high amounts of soda in it, it makes it impossible for any type of vegetation to grow here.
  9. Still, the lake is considered as the youngest and best-preserved impact crater formed in basalt rock and is the only of its kind on earth.
  10. To measure the age of lake, there were different methods used. One was thermoluminescence analysis which revealed that the age of the lake to be 52,000 years old with a spread of 6000 years correction on either side. That simply puts the age of the Lonar Crater Lake to be anywhere between 46,000 years and 58,000 years. On the other hand, the second method was Argon-Argon dating which says that the crater was formed some 570,000 years ago with a spread of 47,000 years correction on either side.
  11. The Lonar Lake has been mentioned in ‘Skanda Purana’ which is the longest of the 18 Mahapuranas that gives insights on the various pilgrim centres in the country.
  12. The crater impact also makes it a place for maskelynite. Maskelynite is a kind of naturally occurring glass that is only formed by extremely high-velocity impacts.
    According to NASA, the crater’s volcanic basalt makes Lonar a well similar to that of impact craters on the surface of the Moon. Wikimedia Commons
    According to NASA, the crater’s volcanic basalt makes Lonar a well similar to that of impact craters on the surface of the Moon. Wikimedia Commons

    The visitors have to trek through the dense forest to reach this marvellous location. One can experience wide varieties of flora and fauna over here. Birds like the Black-winged Stilts, Brahminy ducks and Bay Weavers among others can be spotted here regularly. Even Bats, Langur, Gazelles and Chikaras makes a visit here regularly.

    A series of a low hill around the crater basin sits with an 8 kilometres circumference on the top. The side area of the basin has a steep rise of 75 degrees and is covered with multiple rings of trees. Each ring of the tree is made up of a specific species of tree. For instance, the first and outermost ring is of date palms.

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This NASA-ISRO Mission Set to Crunch Key Space Data in Cloud

"Interest in space helps everybody. And there's a lot of commercial interest now. I think if there is a business to be made, commercial space will do that. When there is no business to be made that no one can make money, then the government should do that

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University of Iowa, Radiation, Sun
FILE - Tourists take pictures of a NASA sign at the Kennedy Space Center visitors complex in Cape Canaveral, Florida, April 14, 2010. VOA

By NISHANT ARORA

As the humankind aims for deeper space missions like Mars in couple of years from now, the time is to democratize humongous data available via NASA and space agencies like the Indian Space Research organization (ISRO) that can boost space research via next-gen Cloud computing, a top NASA-JPL official has stressed.

Scheduled for launch from Sriharikota launch facility in Andhra Pradesh in 2022, the NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) mission is a joint project between the US and Indian space agencies to co-develop and launch a dual-frequency synthetic aperture radar on an Earth observation satellite. The satellite will be the first radar imaging one to use dual frequencies (L and S Band).

ISRO is likely to spend Rs 788 crore while JPL’s work share is expected to be over $800 million on this key project.

Using advanced radar imaging that will provide an unprecedented, detailed view of Earth, NISAR satellite is designed to observe and take measurements of some of the planet’s most complex processes — ecosystem disturbances, ice-sheet collapse and natural hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes and landslides.

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning-driven Cloud computing is certainly going to make the key difference once the satellite is up and running.

“NISAR is going to generate 100 terabytes per day. That’s a lot of data. It’s about a hundred times more than anything we’ve ever done together. It doesn’t fit in our data centres. So we have to put it in the Cloud,” Tom Soderstrom, Chief Innovation and Technology Officer, NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), told IANS during an interaction here.

“The data needs to be worked on for the Indian space agency with several others including NASA. Having it in the Cloud gives us a good place to store, analyse and parse it right for the benefit of humankind,” Soderstrom added.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is a federally-funded research and development center in Pasadena, California.

“For our science data processing part, we discovered that we could use GPUs (graphic processing units) which were never done before. So, for NISAR, we tried GPUs and realized that it’s better, sometimes 100 times better, based on what you’re doing and overall four times faster,” Soderstrom explained.

ISRO
Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) Chairman K. Sivan, left, and Junior Indian Minister for Department of Atomic Energy and Space Jitendra Singh address a news conference in New Delhi. VOA

The data collected from NISAR mission will reveal information about the evolution and state of Earth’s crust, help scientists better understand our planet’s processes and changing climate, and aid future resource and hazard management.

According to Soderstrom, now they can not only process data much faster but also switch between CPUs and GPUs, whichever is the cheapest.

“Cloud will help us process the data differently. Now, you have lots of interesting data for different spacecrafts. We can now apply machine learning to see trends — both in the science and telemetry data,” said the NASA-JPL executive.

At JPL, everyone has intelligent digital assistant Alexa at his or her desk, helping the staffers organise daily tasks while making sense of intrinsic data-sets.

“An intelligent digital assistant has two pieces to it. It knows who I am and also knows how long I’ve been there, meaning it knows my role. So it can tell me things that I need to know before I even know I need them. You can ask Alexa simple things like when is NISAR launching or how much data it is producing on a daily basis, or where my source data is coming from,” Soderstrom explained.

Alexa can tell you about the mission’s budget. It can tell you about the compute environment and “we can speak to it, type to it or text to it. We apply machine learning to make Alexa smarter and smarter over time”.

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Soderstrom is also bullish on space collaborations between countries to create a better world.

“Interest in space helps everybody. And there’s a lot of commercial interest now. I think if there is a business to be made, commercial space will do that. When there is no business to be made that no one can make money, then the government should do that.

“If space becomes the business, then let the business people do it like Elon Musk began by transporting things to the International Space Station (ISS). JPL, on the other hand, wants to go and do things that have never been done before. So if people can go to the moon and mine it, so be it. Once Mars becomes commonplace, we’re going to Jupiter’s moon Europa in search of life,” elaborated Soderstrom. (IANS)