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London: Midwifery Students Learning to Bring New Life with the Help of Augmented Reality Technology

Using AR headsets and lifelike models of full-term mothers, trainee midwives at Middlesex University

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London, Midwifery, Students
Midwifery educator at Middlesex University Sarah Chitongo instructs a trainee midwife wearing an augmented reality (AR) headset in London, Britain, June 17, 2019. VOA

Midwifery students in London are learning to bring new life into the world in a radically new way with the help of augmented reality (AR) technology.

Using AR headsets and lifelike models of full-term mothers, trainee midwives at Middlesex University can take part in fully simulated births, which the university’s clinical staff hope will both hone their clinical skills and leave them better prepared to face challenges rarely seen in day-to-day practice.

AR technology offers users an interactive experience in which objects in the real world are enhanced by computer-generated information.

Midwifery educator Sarah Chitongo said the AR system allowed students to understand better the birthing process by displaying an interactive representation of a patient’s anatomy.

London, Midwifery, Students
Midwifery students in London are learning to bring new life into the world in a radically new way. Pixabay

“It allows you to see a visual picture of the actual anatomy itself, which is raised out of the normal body, and you can step in, walk around and have an internal view,” Chitongo told Reuters.

Chitongo cited high-risk problems such as shoulder dystocia – when a baby’s shoulders get stuck in the mother’s body – and breech births – when a baby is born bottom first – as particular rarities for midwives where AR could help prepare students to cope better and ultimately to save lives.

Chitongo believes that younger trainees will embrace the technology positively as they are of a generation that has largely grown up with computers and interactive environments.

However, her overarching aim is for midwives to become better prepared to reduce mortality rates, which are disproportionately high among ethnic minority pregnancies.

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“Currently, here in the U.K., it sits at 60% combined, compared to 9.8% in white women,” Chitongo said, adding that the issue had not been meaningfully addressed despite the trend having risen since 2011. “When you get it right, with a population where it’s actually on the worst side (of the statistics), it means you’ve got a better and safer maternity service across the U.K.” (VOA)

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Amazing! Students Sting Amazon for Hundreds of Thousands after Discovering Reusable Discount Code Glitch

We'll never need to buy toiletries, cheap novels, highlighter pens, folders or batteries again during our whole university career and well beyond

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Students, Amazon, Discount
We started looking for useful stuff that was a fiver or under and discovered there was loads that we could get that would be really handy - and also some pretty rubbish things we got just for the hell of it. Wikimedia Commons

Amazons Prime Student deal gave new users £5 off their first purchase with a code called ‘Welcome5’ but students quickly got on to the fact that it could be reused multiple times.

Soon, the word spread like wildfire across the UK’s campuses and students began stock-piling up products as toilet rolls and toothpaste – as well as packs of beer, The Sun reported.

“We started looking for useful stuff that was a fiver or under and discovered there was loads that we could get that would be really handy – and also some pretty rubbish things we got just for the hell of it. ‘We’ll never need to buy toiletries, cheap novels, highlighter pens, folders or batteries again during our whole university career and well beyond,” a 19-year-old student in Newcastle told The Sun.

The student said the deal was like an addictive game as they were trying to get things whatever they could find for £5.

Students, Amazon, Discount
Soon, the word spread like wildfire across the UK’s campuses and students began stock-piling up products as toilet rolls and toothpaste – as well as packs of beer, The Sun reported. Wikimedia Commons

Additionally, Ryan, a student in Nottingham, said he saved £164 on 36 items, including food, stationary and more.

“One of my flatmates used the discount to buy sex toys for his girlfriend. I hope they bring it back next year,” Ryan added.

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The glitch was there for 9 days until Amazon realised what was going on last week. (IANS)