Monday March 18, 2019

Longer Exposure to PM2.5 Raises Risk of Diabetes: Study

Air pollution and diabetes are responsible for millions of death globally

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Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Researchers from the Fuwai Hospital under the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences as well as Emory University in the United States evaluated the association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 and diabetes incidence based on data collected from more than 88,000 Chinese adults, the Xinhua reported.

The team used satellite-based PM2.5 concentrations to assess PM2.5 exposure for each subject during the period 2004-2015.

For an increase of 10 micrograms per cubic meter of long-term PM2.5 concentration, the risk of diabetes incidence increased by 15.7 per cent, according to the study published in the journal Environment International.

The study would benefit policy making and intervention design in diabetes prevention, the researchers said.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Our future work will focus on introducing spatiotemporal data of PM2.5 at higher resolution and indoor source of exposures to further detect the health effects of long-term exposure to PM2.5,” said Lu Xiangfeng, from the Fuwai Hospital.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), air pollution can lead to lung cancer, respiratory infection, stroke, and even heart disease.

Also Read- Early Exposure To Alcohol Can Increases The Risk For Anxiety Later in Life

Air pollution and diabetes are responsible for millions of death globally.

Data from the WHO show that in 2014, 8.5 per cent of adults developed diabetes, and that in 2015, this health condition resulted in 1.6 million deaths. (IANS)

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Joint Surgery May Spike up Blood Sugar Levels in Diabetics

Haemoglobin A1c above 6.59 for people with insulin-dependent diabetes and 6.6 without the condition was associated with an elevated risk for post-operative hyperglycemia

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Knee Joint. Pixabay.

People with diabetes who undergo joint replacement surgery are at higher risk of experiencing elevated blood sugar levels after the operation, increasing their chances of developing infections and other complications, a new study suggested.

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes were more than five times as likely as those without the condition to develop hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, after surgery, said researchers, including Bradford Waddell from the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in the US.

“If your patient comes in with diabetes and is dependent on insulin, you need to be more cognizant of controlling their blood sugar in the perioperative period because they’re at higher risk,” said Waddell.

For the study, presented at the 2019 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the team reviewed medical charts of 773 men and women who had undergone total hip or knee replacement surgeries between 2011 and 2016.

Of those, 437 had insulin-dependent diabetes, while 336 had not the condition. It included patients with a diagnosis of diabetes whose blood sugar was being controlled using the hormone insulin and compared them with diabetics who did not require insulin.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Patients requiring insulin can be considered to have more severe diabetes and have a greater chance of experiencing elevated blood glucose in the perioperative period, Waddell said.

Patients with higher blood glucose over the previous three months — as measured by Hemoglobin A1c — were more likely to experience post-operative hyperglycemia regardless of which group they were in.

Also Read- Excessive Hygiene Can Cause Antibiotic Resistance, Says Study

Hemoglobin A1c above 6.59 for people with insulin-dependent diabetes and 6.6 without the condition was associated with an elevated risk for post-operative hyperglycemia.

However, despite the increased risk for elevation in blood sugar after surgery, the incidence of post-operative joint infections did not differ between the two groups of patients. The author also noted that a limitation of the study was that it was underpowered to detect the risk of infection. (IANS)