Tuesday October 22, 2019

Longer Exposure to PM2.5 Raises Risk of Diabetes: Study

Air pollution and diabetes are responsible for millions of death globally

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Diabetes
According to the researchers, these novel findings may provide the basis for new therapies for patients who have heart disease complicated by diabetes. Pixabay

Researchers from the Fuwai Hospital under the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences as well as Emory University in the United States evaluated the association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 and diabetes incidence based on data collected from more than 88,000 Chinese adults, the Xinhua reported.

The team used satellite-based PM2.5 concentrations to assess PM2.5 exposure for each subject during the period 2004-2015.

For an increase of 10 micrograms per cubic meter of long-term PM2.5 concentration, the risk of diabetes incidence increased by 15.7 per cent, according to the study published in the journal Environment International.

The study would benefit policy making and intervention design in diabetes prevention, the researchers said.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Our future work will focus on introducing spatiotemporal data of PM2.5 at higher resolution and indoor source of exposures to further detect the health effects of long-term exposure to PM2.5,” said Lu Xiangfeng, from the Fuwai Hospital.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), air pollution can lead to lung cancer, respiratory infection, stroke, and even heart disease.

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Air pollution and diabetes are responsible for millions of death globally.

Data from the WHO show that in 2014, 8.5 per cent of adults developed diabetes, and that in 2015, this health condition resulted in 1.6 million deaths. (IANS)

Next Story

Rotavirus Relates to Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers suggests that Rotavirus infection might play a role in the generation of Type 1 Diabetes

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Diabetes
Rotavirus vaccination can contribute to the primary prevention of Type 1 Diabetes. Pixabay

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have found that rotavirus infection might play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes.

Rotavirus remains the major cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide, although the advent of vaccination has substantially decreased associated mortality.

Following the recent introduction of rotavirus vaccination, there has been a 15 per cent decrease in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australian children under four years of age.

“Vaccination against rotavirus may have the additional benefit in some children of being a primary prevention for type 1 diabetes,” said the study’s lead author Leonard C. Harrison.

Diabetes
The recent introduction of rotavirus vaccination, there has been a 15 per cent decrease in the incidence of type 1 Diabetes in Australian children. Pixabay

The study published in the journal PLOS suggested that rotavirus vaccination could contribute to the primary prevention of this autoimmune disease.

This finding complements human and animal studies implicating rotavirus in the development of type 1 diabetes in genetically susceptible children.

In the article, the research team begin by reviewing molecular evidence supporting their hypothesis and point out the association between rotavirus infection and serum islet autoantibodies.

Diabetes
Rotavirus infection might play a role in the development of type 1 Diabetes. Pixabay

The results showed that rotavirus infection-induced pancreatic pathology, as well as environmental factors that promote the rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.

After reviewing population-level data, the study suggested that rotavirus vaccination might be associated with a decrease in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.

According to the researchers, it will be important to identify which children are most likely to be protected by rotavirus vaccination.

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Moreover, future studies should aim to reveal disease mechanisms and directly demonstrate whether rotavirus infects human pancreas prior to the onset of islet autoimmunity or type 1 diabetes. (IANS)