Thursday March 21, 2019

Loss of Teeth in Elder People Linked to Malnutrition

The results showed that 20.6 per cent of participants were at risk for malnutrition and 4.7 per cent were malnourished

0
//
Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
US kids use excess toothpaste: Report. Pixabay

Older adults with just 10 to 19 teeth are at higher risk malnutrition, warns a new study.

These patients also had higher rates of weight loss, lower appetite and were at increased risk for dementia and/or depression as well as severe illnesses than those who had a normal nutrition status.

Older adults were also found to be at risk for impaired oral health, the findings showed.

“The mouth is the entry way for food and fluid intake. If its integrity is impaired, the functional ability of an individual to consume an adequate diet may be adversely impacted,” said Rena Zelig, lead author at Rutgers University in the US.

Further, the researchers said that dental clinics were ideal locations to perform nutritional status screenings as they can identify patients who may not regularly visit a primary care provider and who may be at risk for malnutrition.

teeth
In addition, greater than 87 per cent of them partially or completely lacked teeth. Pixabay

“Clinicians also can provide patients with referrals to Registered Dietitians and community assistance programmes such as Meals on Wheels to prevent further decline in nutritional status,” Zelig said.

The study, published in Journal of Ageing Research and Clinical Practice, analysed the health records of 107 senior citizens treated aged 65 and above.

The results showed that 20.6 per cent of participants were at risk for malnutrition and 4.7 per cent were malnourished.

Also Read- Here’s How Cannabis Affect Women

In addition, greater than 87 per cent of them partially or completely lacked teeth.

However, further study was needed to examine the relationships between tooth loss and malnutrition risk and the impact of tooth loss on the eating experience and eating-related quality of life, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Develop Novel Method to Predict Mortality in Elderly

The quantification of the immune system's ageing is a complex challenge that requires multidimensional monitoring over time

0
FILE - An elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pennsylvania, Nov. 6, 2015. -VOA

Researchers have developed a method to assess the “age” of patients’ immune systems, thus predicting mortality in older adults.

According to researchers from the Israel Institute of Technology (Technion), the immune age is a kind of biological clock that will help identify an early weakening of the immune system.

The new model will help devise preventive measures to reduce disease and mortality, Xinhua news agency reported.

In the study, Technion scientists, along with a team from the Stanford University in California, were able to quantify the changes in the immune system that happen over the years.

In nine years, they characterised the immune systems of 135 healthy people of different ages once a year and built a model that quantifies these changes in a specific person.

The data enabled the researchers to quantify the immune age in an index called “IMM-AGE score”, which provides information that the chronological age cannot tell.

Representational image for elders.
New method developed to help predict mortality in elderly. Pixabay

Using the new method, the team quantified the immunisation age of more than 2,000 elders.

The researchers believe that with the new method, they will also be able to characterise genes that affect immunisation age, and even identify lifestyle, habits and medications that affect the “age”.

With an increase in inflammatory processes, the human body undergoes slow and constant functional weakening of the immune system.

Also Read- Sri Lanka Warns of Extreme Heat Amid Rising Temperatures

Ageing of the immune system has devastating consequences, including an inability to cope with infections and an increased risk of chronic diseases such as cancer.

The quantification of the immune system’s ageing is a complex challenge that requires multidimensional monitoring over time. (IANS)