Friday April 10, 2020

Low Blood Pressure Linked to Higher Mortality Risk in Older Adults

Older people with low BP at higher mortality risk

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blood-pressure mortality
Researchers have found that low blood pressure is linked to high mortality in older adults. Pixabay

Older people, please take note. Health and lifestyle researchers have found that low blood pressure is linked to high mortality in older adults.

The study, published in the journal Age and Ageing, analysed 415,980 electronic medical records of older adults in the UK.

“We know that treating blood pressure helps to prevent strokes and heart attacks and we would not advise anyone to stop taking their medications unless guided by their doctor,” said study lead author Jane Masoli from University of Exeter in the UK.

The research was conducted after some countries have changed blood pressure guidelines to encourage clinicians to take measures to reduce blood pressure in a bid to improve health outcomes. UK blood pressure guidelines are within safe parameters for all. However, previous research has not considered the impact on frail older adults, who are often omitted from trials. During the findings, the research team found that people aged 75 or over with low blood pressure (below 130/80) had increased mortality rates in the follow-up, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

blood-pressure mortality
During the findings, the research team found that people aged 75 or over with low blood pressure (below 130/80) had increased mortality rates in the follow-up, compared to those with normal blood pressure. Pixabay

This was especially pronounced in ‘frail’ individuals, who had 62 per cent increased risk of death during the 10 year follow-up, the study said. Although high blood pressure increased risk of cardiovascular incidents, such as heart attacks, it was not linked to higher mortality in frail adults over 75.

Older people aged 85 and over who had raised blood pressure actually had reduced mortality rates, compared to those with lower blood pressure, regardless of whether they were frail or not. “Internationally, guidelines are moving towards tight blood pressure targets, but our findings indicate that this may not be appropriate in frail older adults,” Masoli said.

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“We need more research to ascertain whether aggressive blood pressure control is safe in older adults, and then for which patient groups there may be benefit, so we can move towards more personalised blood pressure management in older adults,” Masoli concluded. The University of Exeter is a public research university in South West England and it was founded and received its royal charter in 1955. (IANS)

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Vitamin-D Rich Food May Be Good For Your Heart Health

The research from Harokopio University was conducted during 2001-2012 and included 1,514 men and 1,528 women from the greater Athens area, in Greece  

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Vitamin-D
People who get too little vitamin D may develop soft, thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Pixabay

Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects.

Vitamin D is a nutrient found in some foods that is needed for health and to maintain strong bones. It does so by helping the body absorb calcium (one of bone’s main building blocks) from food and supplements.

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Some food items that are high in vitamin D are salmon fish, herring and sardines, cheese, cod liver oil, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms and fortified foods. People who get too little vitamin D may develop soft, thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults.

The current study, published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, aimed to evaluate the association between dietary vitamin D intake and 10-year first fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD), conventional CVD risk factors and surrogate markers related to inflammation, coagulation, insulin resistance, liver and renal function.

The research from Harokopio University was conducted during 2001-2012 and included 1,514 men and 1,528 women from the greater Athens area, in Greece.

Heart
Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects. Pixabay

Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects. PixabayAccording to the researchers, dietary assessment was based on a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

Daily intake of vitamin D was calculated using a standardised food database.

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The research found that in the lowest, middle, and highest categories of vitamin D intake, cardiovascular events (such as heart attacks and strokes) occurred in 24 per cent, 17 per cent, and 12 per cent of men and 14 per cent, 10 per cent, and 11 per cent of women.

In contrast with vitamin D supplementation trials that have shown modest to neutral beneficial effects on heart health, this study revealed that increased vitamin D intake from food sources may protect against heart-related problems, especially in men. (IANS)