Wednesday March 27, 2019

Low-Calorie Diet And Healthy Eating Improve Your Cell Performance

The researchers found that while those in the group that had no dietary restrictions had seizures, those whose calories were restricted did not.

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The study on mice showed that a low-calorie diet can protect the brain from neuronal cell death associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy and cerebral vascular accident (CVA). Pixabay

Consuming low-calorie food may have a protective effect against some diseases as the number of calories a person eats directly influences the performance of various cells, researchers say.

The study on mice showed that a low-calorie diet can protect the brain from neuronal cell death associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, epilepsy and cerebral vascular accident (CVA).

“We are looking at how changes to the diet affect metabolism and how that ends up changing the odds of having diseases associated with aging,” said co-author Alicia Kowaltowski, Professor at the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

For the study, presented at FAPESP Week London, taking place on February 11-13, the research team divided mice into two groups.

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We are looking at how changes to the diet affect metabolism and how that ends up changing the odds of having diseases associated with aging,” said co-author Alicia Kowaltowski, Professor at the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil. Pixabay

They calculated the average number of calories the group with no caloric restrictions would eat and then fed the other group 40 per cent fewer calories.

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After 14 weeks, mice belonging to the two groups were given an injection containing a substance known to cause seizures, damage and neuronal cell death.

The researchers found that while those in the group that had no dietary restrictions had seizures, those whose calories were restricted did not. (IANS)

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Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

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The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

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A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

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Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

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“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)