Saturday November 17, 2018

Low Carb and High Fat Diet May Help Maintain Eyesight

Higher rates of glaucoma in people with diabetes suggests a potential connection between this eye disease and metabolic stress.

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Switching mice destined to develop glaucoma to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet protects the cells of the retina and their connections to the brain from degeneration.
Diet is very important in maintaining a healthy eyesight. Pixabay
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Besides helping lose weight, consuming a ketogenic diet — which is high fat, low protein and low carbohydrates — can also help maintain vision in patients with glaucoma, finds a study conducted over mice.

Glaucoma is a progressive disease in which damage to the cells that transmit visual information to the brain leads to vision loss and, in some cases, blindness.

Higher rates of glaucoma in people with diabetes suggests a potential connection between this eye disease and metabolic stress.

Switching mice destined to develop glaucoma to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet protects the cells of the retina and their connections to the brain from degeneration.
Low carb diet can maintain eyesight. Pixabay

The findings led by Denise Inman from the Northeast Ohio Medical University in the US showed that low carb, high fat diet protects retina cells and their connections to the brain from degeneration.

Switching mice destined to develop glaucoma to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet protects the cells of the retina and their connections to the brain from degeneration.

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The results, published in the journal JNeurosci, found that feeding mice, genetically modified to develop glaucoma, a ketogenic diet composed of nearly 90 per cent fat for two months protected retinal cells from degeneration by increasing energy availability.

Although further research into this intervention is required, these findings suggest that a ketogenic diet may help to maintain vision in patients with glaucoma, the researchers said. (IANS)

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Diet Containing High Amount of Carbohydrates May Lead to Obesity in Some

According to lead author Bill Ballard from the University of New South Wales, the research was a rare demonstration of positive selection at work in evolution

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High carbohydrate diet may induce obesity in some: Study. Pixabay

Researchers have identified a DNA mutation common in animals that may explain why a diet high in carbohydrates induces obesity and diabetes in some but not others.

The study, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, showed a surprising difference between two sets of the fruit flies when feeding with alternate diets high in protein and high in carbohydrates.

Fruit fly larvae with a noted mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation showed a pronounced increase in development when eating high carbohydrate diet of banana, but stagnated on a high protein diet of passion fruit, Xinhua news agency quoted the study as saying.

Conversely, fruit fly larvae without that mutation thrived on the high protein diet, but dropped in frequency when put on carbohydrates, the report said.

The six-year collaborative study by Australian, American and Spanish researchers challenged the neutral theory of molecular evolution in which changes in species at the molecular level are random, not caused by natural selection and provide no benefit or disadvantage to the species.

Obesity, Pregnancy
Representational image. Pixabay

According to lead author Bill Ballard from the University of New South Wales, the research was a rare demonstration of positive selection at work in evolution.

Given that humans share 75 per cent of the same genes as fruit flies, and have the same mtDNA genes, it is likely, according to the study, that the same mutation inherited in human mtDNA may metabolise carbohydrates in a similar way.

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“But, the news is not all bad for people harbouring the mutation,” said Ballard.

“You would need to manage your carbohydrate intake when you are younger, but if you are unfortunate enough to develop Parkinson’s Disease, a high carbohydrate diet will help you maintain weight,” Ballard added. (IANS)