Wednesday January 29, 2020

Low-Cost Text Messaging Programme Improves Blood Sugar Control in Patients with Diabetes

Capitalising on the exponential growth in mobile phone usage over the past decade, a simple text messaging programme could increase the reach

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Diabetes, Messaging, Blood Sugar
The effect in this study was not only statistically significant but also has the potential to be clinically relevant by reducing risk of diabetic complications and death. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a low-cost text messaging programme improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease.

“The effect in this study was not only statistically significant but also has the potential to be clinically relevant by reducing risk of diabetic complications and death,” said study researcher Xiqian Huo from Fuwai Hospital in China.

“Capitalising on the exponential growth in mobile phone usage over the past decade, a simple text messaging programme could increase the reach of diabetes self-management support,” she added.

It may provide a means to better address the burgeoning healthcare demand-capacity imbalance.

Diabetes, Messaging, Blood Sugar
Researchers have found that a low-cost text messaging programme improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease. Pixabay

For the study presented at the ESC Congress 2019 in France, the researchers enrolled 502 patients from 34 clinics in China and the patients were randomly assigned to the text messaging intervention or a control group for six months.

The intervention group received six messages per week, at random times of the day, from an automated system set up by the researchers.

The messages were designed to provide information and motivation and help patients set goals and manage stress.

The control group received two thank you text messages per month.

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At six months, blood glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to the control group (6.7 per cent versus 7.2 per cent).

On an average, HbA1c fell by 0.2 per cent in the intervention group and rose by 0.1 per cent in the control group – a difference of 0.3 per cent between groups.

The change in fasting blood glucose was larger in the intervention, compared to control, group (-0.5 versus 0.1 mmol/L, respectively).

The intervention was acceptable to participants, 97 per cent found the text messages useful, readable and an appropriate method of contact. (IANS)

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Children of Mothers With Diabetes Are Likely To Suffer From Heart Diseases, Says Study

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes

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Diabetes
Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified in the Study. Pixabay

Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned.

The increased rates were more pronounced among children of mothers with a history of CVD or diabetic complications, said the study published in the journal The BMJ.

“Our study provides evidence that children of mothers with diabetes, especially those with a history of CVD or with diabetic complications, had increased rates of early onset CVD throughout the early decades of life,” said study researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark.

If this association is shown to be causal, preventing, screening, and treating diabetes in women of childbearing age could be important not only for improving the health of the women but also for reducing long term risks of CVD in their offspring, the researchers added

The number of women diagnosed with diabetes before or during pregnancy has increased globally, and children of these women are more likely to have risk factors for future CVD, such as high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels. It is unclear, however, whether or to what extent exposure to diabetes in the womb increases the risk of developing CVD in offspring over a lifetime.

So an international team of researchers set out to evaluate associations between diabetes diagnosed before or during pregnancy and early onset CVD in children during their first four decades of life. They base their findings on national registry data for over 2.4 million children born without congenital heart disease in Denmark from 1977 to 2016.

Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified.

Diabetes
Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned. Pixabay

Other potentially influential factors, such as mother’s age, education, lifestyle and medical history were also taken into account. During up to 40 years of follow-up, children of mothers with diabetes had a 29 per cent increased overall rate of early onset CVD compared with children of mothers who did not have diabetes (cumulative risks: 17.8 per cent vs 13.1 per cent ).

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes, particularly heart failure (45 per cent), hypertensive disease (78 per cent), deep vein thrombosis (82 per cent), and pulmonary embolism (91 per cent).

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Increased rates were seen in each age group in childhood (before 20 years of age) and early adulthood (from 20 to 40 years of age), regardless of the type of diabetes they were exposed to (pregestational or gestational) and rates were similar for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the study said. (IANS)