Friday February 21, 2020

Drinking Low-Fat Milk Can Help Slow Down Biological Aging: Researchers

Drinking low-fat milk linked to less aging in adults

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Low-fat milk
Drinking low-fat milk is significantly linked with less aging in adults. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that drinking low-fat milk is significantly associated with less aging in adults.

Published in the the journal Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, the study from Brigham Young University found that people who drink low-fat milk experience several years less biological aging than those who drink high-fat (two per cent and whole) milk.

“It was surprising how strong the difference was, if you’re going to drink high-fat milk, you should be aware that doing so is predictive of or related to some significant consequences,” said study researcher Larry Tucker from Brigham Young University in the US.

For the study, the researchers investigated the relationship between telomere length and both milk intake frequency (daily drinkers vs weekly drinkers or less) and milk fat content consumed (whole vs two per cent vs one per cent vs skim).

Low-fat milk
The findings provide support for the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2015-2020), which encourage adults to consume low-fat milk, both nonfat and one per cent milk, and not high-fat milk, as part of a healthy diet. Pixabay

Telomeres are the nucleotide endcaps of human chromosomes. They act like a biological clock and they’re extremely correlated with age; each time a cell replicates, humans lose a tiny bit of the endcaps. Therefore, the older people get, the shorter their telomeres, the researchers said. And, apparently, the more high-fat milk people drink, the shorter their telomeres are, according to the study.

The study revealed that for every one per cent increase in milk fat consumed (drinking two per cent vs one per cent milk), telomeres were 69 base pairs shorter in the adults studied, which translated into more than four years in additional biological aging. When research team analysed the extremes of milk drinkers, adults who consumed whole milk had telomeres that were a striking 145 base pairs shorter than non-fat milk drinkers.

Nearly half of the people in the study consumed milk daily and another quarter consumed milk at least weekly. Just under a third of the adults reported consuming full-fat (whole) milk and another 30 per cent reported drinking two per cent milk.

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Meanwhile, 10 per cent consumed one per cent milk and another 17 per cent drank nonfat milk. About 13 per cent did not drink any cow milk.

The findings provide support for the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2015-2020), which encourage adults to consume low-fat milk, both nonfat and one per cent milk, and not high-fat milk, as part of a healthy diet. (IANS)

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Higher Fruits and Vegetables Intake Beneficial for Women: Health Researchers

Higher fruits intake linked to fewer menopausal symptoms

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A healthy diet, rich in fruits and vegetables is known to benefit the human body in so many ways. Pixabay

A healthy diet, rich in fruits and vegetables is known to benefit the human body in so many ways, as now health and lifestyle researchers have found that it may also play a role in lessening various menopause symptoms.

Although hormone therapy has been proven to be an acceptable method for treatment of menopause-related symptoms for many women, the search for nonpharmacologic treatment options is ongoing, especially for women with certain risk factors and those who are not candidates for hormone therapy.

Specifically, there has been a focus on identifying modifiable lifestyle factors that might prevent or alleviate menopause symptoms, said the study, published in the Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society.

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Eating fruits and vegetables may also play a role in lessening various menopause symptoms. Pixabay

“This small cross-sectional study provides some preliminary evidence regarding the influence of fruit and vegetable intake on menopause symptoms,” said study researcher Stephanie Faubion from The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in the US.

NAMS is North America’s leading nonprofit organisation dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging.

According to the researchers, previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may play a critical role in estrogen production, metabolism, and consequently, menopause symptoms.

In particular, the consumption of fruits or a Mediterranean-style diet, characterised by a high content of vegetables, fruits, cereals, and nuts, was linked to fewer menopause symptoms and complaints.

This new study goes a step further in looking at specific fruits and vegetables and their effects on various menopause symptoms.

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Citrus fruits, for example, were called out as having an adverse effect on urogenital scores compared with other types of fruits, as were green leafy or dark yellow vegetables compared with other vegetables, they added.

“There is ample evidence that a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables has a beneficial effect on health in a myriad of ways, but additional study is needed to determine whether various menopause symptoms may be affected by dietary choices,” Faubion said. (IANS)