Sunday November 17, 2019

Maintain Good Relationship With Family To Stay Healthy

Having poor relationships with family can affect your health negatively

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Family
Having a strained relationship with family may be more harmful to people's health. Pixabay

Having a strained relationship with parents, siblings or child may be more harmful to people’s health than enduring rocky romantic partnerships, according to a new study.

“We found that family emotional climate had a big effect on overall health, including the development or worsening of chronic conditions such as stroke and headaches over the 20-year span of midlife,” the study’s lead author Sarah B. Woods, Assistant Professor at University of Texas, said.

“Contrary to previous research, which found that intimate relationships had a large effect on physical health, we did not get the same results.”

For the study published in the Journal of Family Psychology, the researchers used data from 2,802 participants in the Midlife Development in the US survey that included a nationally representative sample of adults from 1995 to 2014.

Family
The family emotional climate has a big effect on the overall mental and physical health. Pixabay

Three rounds of data were collected in 1995 to 1996, 2004 to 2006 and 2013 to 2014.

The average participant was 45-years-old during the first round.

The survey asked questions about family strain and family support as well as an intimate partner strain.

Health was measured using participants’ total number of chronic conditions, such as stroke, headaches and stomach trouble, experienced in the 12 months prior to each of the three data collection times.

Participants also rated their overall health from excellent to poor at each round.

The researchers found that greater family relationship strain was associated with a greater number of chronic conditions and worse health appraisal 10 years later, during the second and third rounds of data collection.

“Comparatively, we found that greater family support during the second round of data collection in 2004 to 2006 was associated with better health appraisal 10 years later,” said the study’s co-author Jacob B. Priest, Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa.

Family fights
Greater family support is associated with better health appraisal. Pixabay

There were no significant effects of intimate partner relationships on health outcomes, the study said.

“We were honestly stunned that there were zero associations between intimate partner emotional climate and later health,” Woods said.

The lack of significant associations between intimate partner relationships and later health could be because those relationships can break up, whereas people are more likely to have longer associations with family members who aren’t a spouse, the researchers noted.

Also Read- 30% Professionals Suffer From Mental Disorders

“For adults who already have a chronic condition, a negative family emotional climate may increase their poor health and conversely, supportive family members may help improve their health outcomes,” Woods added. (IANS)

Next Story

Immune Cells Become Active and Repair Brain While Sleep: Study

For the findings, researchers conducted the study on mice

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Sleep
Study suggests that the enhanced remodeling of neural circuits and repair of lesions during Sleep may be mediated in part by the ability of microglia to dynamically interact with the Brain. Pixabay

Researchers have found that immune cells called microglia, which play an important role in reorganising the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage, are also primarily active while we sleep.

Microglia serve as the brain’s first responders, patrolling the brain and spinal cord and springing into action to stamp out infections or gobble up debris from dead cell tissue.

“This research shows that the signals in our brain that modulate the sleep and awake state also act as a switch that turns the immune system off and on,” said study lead author Ania Majewska, Professor at University of Rochester in the US.

In previous studies, Majewska’s lab has shown how microglia interact with synapses, the juncture where the axons of one neuron connects and communicates with its neighbours.

The microglia help maintain the health and function of the synapses and prune connections between nerve cells when they are no longer necessary for brain function.

For the findings, researchers conducted the study on mice.

The current study points to the role of norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that signals arousal and stress in the central nervous system.

This chemical is present in low levels in the brain while we sleep, but when production ramps up it arouses our nerve cells, causing us to wake up and become alert.

The study showed that norepinephrine also acts on a specific receptor, the beta2 adrenergic receptor, which is expressed at high levels in microglia.

When this chemical is present in the brain, the microglia slip into a sort of hibernation.

Sleep
Researchers have found that immune cells called microglia, which play an important role in reorganising the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage, are also primarily active while we Sleep and affects Brain. Pixabay

The study, which employed an advanced imaging technology that allows researchers to observe activity in the living brain, showed that when mice were exposed to high levels of norepinephrine, the microglia became inactive and were unable to respond to local injuries and pulled back from their role in rewiring brain networks.

“This work suggests that the enhanced remodeling of neural circuits and repair of lesions during sleep may be mediated in part by the ability of microglia to dynamically interact with the brain,” said study first author Rianne Stowell.

ALSO READ: Scientists Link ‘Brain Fog’ to Body Illness

“Altogether, this research also shows that microglia are exquisitely sensitive to signals that modulate brain function and that microglial dynamics and functions are modulated by the behavioural state of the animal,” Stowell said.

The study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience. (IANS)