Friday January 24, 2020

Majority of Society in a Time Warp, Says Nawazuddin Siddiqui

"Manto" travelled to several international film festivals like Cannes and Toronto, but did not fare well at the Indian box office

0
//
Nawazuddin Siddiqui Buys A Plot To Farm. Flickr
Majority of society in a time warp: Nawazuddin Siddiqui. Flickr

By Arundhuti Banerjee 

Actor Nawazuddin Siddiqui, who stars as Saadat Haasan Manto in “Manto” — an Indian film that is not getting released in Pakistan — says society continues to remain stubborn in its reluctance to accept the bitter truth.

As the film has not got the green light for release, writers, activists and journalists got together last week to protest in different cities of Pakistan.

While “Manto” director Nandita Das has expressed gratitude to the supporters, Nawazuddin told IANS here: “The majority of the society has not grown up intellectually to embrace the truth. That is why we are still living in the same society and stuck in time… That is why what Saadat Hassan Manto faced in his time is still the reality. The problems are still existing and his story is still relevant.”

“Yes, like the way there were few liberal-minded people — writers, authors and intellectuals stood by him — in the present time, a few people have also stood by the film. But all of us are really in the minority, you know,” he added.

Isn?t it quite a pessimistic thought?

The actor promptly responded: “No, no, don’t get me wrong. I want to add that those few liberal-minded people are the reason why the world is still a nice place to live in. They are the hope that drives all of us to work with conviction and stand strong for the truth.

Actor Nawazuddin Siddhiqui, Wikimedia

“Otherwise people will just look for an opportunity to kill each other.”

The film “Manto”, a biopic on Manto, released in India in September last year. It features Rasika Dugal, Divya Dutta, Paresh Rawal and Rishi Kapoor.

“Manto” travelled to several international film festivals like Cannes and Toronto, but did not fare well at the Indian box office.

Also Read- Social Networking Giant Facebook Testing ‘LOL’ App to Woo Kids

“Initially, when the film released in India, since we did not get a good number of screens and audience reach, I was upset. Later when the film released digitally and the response started pouring in, I was glad that the film got a great shelf life on Netflix, and we did a good job. We gained confidence,” said the actor, who is determined to be part of such stories in future.

“Few stories are so compelling that when a filmmaker is ready to tell the unadulterated version of it on the big screen, as an actor you feel excited to do such a film. Of course, ?Manto? was one of such project and I will be doing such films in coming days,” said Nawazuddin, who will next be seen in “Thackeray” as late Shiv Sena supremo Balasaheb Thackeray.  (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s how you can Appear More Competent Through your Clothing

Secret to appear more competent hidden in your clothing

0
Competent clothing
A richer clothing can help you look more competent. Lifetime Stock

People tend to instantly judge others as more competent if they come dressed in “richer” clothing, says a study that warned that such economic cues are hard to ignore.

In nine studies conducted by researchers, people rated the competence of faces wearing different upper-body clothing.

Clothing perceived as “richer” by an observer — whether it was a T-shirt, sweater, or other top — led to higher competence ratings of the person pictured than similar clothes judged as “poorer,” the researchers found.

Given that competence is often associated with social status, the findings, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, suggest that low-income individuals may face hurdles in relation to how others perceive their abilities — simply from looking at their clothing.

“Poverty is a place rife with challenges. Instead of respect for the struggle, people living in poverty face a persistent disregard and disrespect by the rest of society,” said study co-author Eldar Shafir, Professor at Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University in the US.

competent fashion
Competence is often associated with social status and it is reflected through clothing. Lifetime Stock

“We found that such disrespect — clearly unfounded, since in these studies the identical face was seen as less competent when it appeared with poorer clothing — can have its beginnings in the first tenth of a second of an encounter,” Shafir said.

The researchers began with images of 50 faces, each wearing clothes rated as “richer” or “poorer” by an independent group of judges.

Based on those ratings, the researchers selected 18 black and 18 white face-clothing pairs displaying the most prominent rich-poor differences. These were then used across the nine studies.

Participants were then presented with half of the faces wearing “richer” upper-body clothing, and the other half with “poorer” clothing.

The researchers found that across the studies faces were judged as significantly more competent when the clothing was perceived as “richer.”

Also Read- Here’s how People Themselves Become the Source of Misinformation

This judgment was made almost instantaneously and also when more time was provided.

When warned that clothing had nothing to do with competence, or explicitly asked to ignore what the person in the photo was wearing, the biased competency judgments persisted. (IANS)