Thursday May 24, 2018
Home Business Make in India...

Make in India: DMRC making 90% of trains locally

0
//
99
Republish
Reprint

metro-355255_640

By Newsgram Staff Writer

The Delhi Metro is already walking the talk, when it comes to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s pet scheme “Make in India”. 90 per cent of the trains under Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) are being manufactured in India, reported an English newspaper.

In the Phase III metro, out of 846 coaches ordered, only 120 are from Korea, rest are manufactured in the country. The trains made in India are also being exported to Queensland and Sydney, quoted Times of India.

H S Anand, Delhi Metro’s director said, “We have been consistently increasing the number of indigenous trains in the system. Of 1,234 coaches in Phase I and II, 36 were from Germany and 64 were from Korea.”

For the last 10 years DMRC has kept the capital cost for procurement of these coaches at a consistent level. DMRC spokesman, Anuj Dayal, said “These costs are substantially lower than the cost of Metro coaches world over.”

Mangu Singh, the DMRC head, said, “Delhi Metro’s initiative to indigenize the manufacturing of its trains and ancillary technologies is in consonance with the ‘Make in India’ initiative of the government of India.”

Three Metro coach manufacturing units have set up their base in India. These are Bombardier Transportation in Savli, Gujarat, state-owned Bharat Earth Movers Limited in Bengaluru, and Alstom, which has established a new facility at Sricity near Chennai in Tamil Nadu.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Permission to Cover N-Site Closure is Denied by South Korea

North Korean authorities on Tuesday morning denied permission to South Korean journalists to attend the dismantling of their nuclear base scheduled to take place between May 23-25.

0
//
12
South Korean police on Friday sought an arrest warrant against the younger daughter of the president of Korean Air for allegedly assaulting an advertising agency executive in April.
Flag of South Korea, Pixabay

North Korean authorities on Tuesday morning denied permission to South Korean journalists to attend the dismantling of their nuclear base scheduled to take place between May 23-25.

Pyongyang had originally invited the South Korean media along with those from Russia, the US, the UK, and China, but the South Korean journalists’ list was rejected on Tuesday, Efe news reported quoting Seoul’s Ministry of Unification.

Members of a news agency and a South Korean television network had travelled to Beijing to fly to North Korea from there on Tuesday to attend the dismantling ceremony.

The Ministry in a statement said it regretted Pyongyang’s decision but despite the setback, it will continue working towards cooperating with Pyongyang and improving US-North Korea ties.

folk tale
representational image. Wikimedia

The announcement of the closure of the Punggye-ri base came during the inter-Korean summit, when Pyongyang pledged to work towards total denuclearisation, after claiming that it would stop its weapons tests.

Pyongyang, which announced that it wanted the closure to be made public with the presence of foreign journalists, has conducted six underground nuclear tests, including the last and most powerful in September 2017.

Also Read: Does Social Media Make Young Girls Unhappy?

The latest cancellation is a new setback after last week when Pyongyang abruptly suspended a high-level meeting with Seoul after accusing it of holding joint military exercises with the US.

Kim Jong-un’s regime also said that holding the summit with US President Donald Trump would be uncertain due to the pressure from the White House on the denuclearisation model that it wants to impose on North Korea. (IANS)

Next Story

Pakistan Tests its 1st Metro Train in Lahore Under CPEC

Pakistan on Wednesday made a test run of its first metro train service in Lahore, the capital of the country's eastern Punjab province, from Dera Gujran to Lakshmi Chowk on a 12-km portion of the total 27.1-km route.

0
//
31