Thursday March 21, 2019

Male smokers in India increased since 1998

0
//

New Delhi: An Indian-origin researcher recently said in his study that the number of male smokers in India rose to 108 million between 1998 and 2015.

However, there was no considerable increase in young female smokers.

It is quite alarming that men of ages 15-69 years smoking any type of tobacco rose from 79 million in 1998 to 108 million in 2015, representing an average annual increase of about 1.7 million male smokers.

According to the study published in BMJ Global Health, the percent of smokers declined from 27 in 1998 to 24 in 2010 but the total number rose due to the population growth.

Sadly, about one million deaths were caused in 2010 due to smoking equivalent 10 per cent of all deaths in India, out of which 70 percent of deaths occurred between the ages of 30 and 69.

China is the only country in the world with more smokers than India.

The study covered smoking trends in India, using three nationally representative surveys covering 14 million residents between 1998-2010, which made forward projections to 2015.

The study also found that cigarettes were replaced by the traditional bidi, a small, inexpensive Indian cigarette, possibly due to substantially higher income in India and population growth.

In urban India, the number rose about 68 percent from 19 to 31 million while in rural India it was 26 percent from 61 to 77 million.

At the ages 15-69 years, there were about 11 million women who smoked – about one-tenth of the total of male smokers.

The smoking prevalence in women born after 1960 was about half of the prevalence in women born before 1950, suggesting that there is no increase in young women smoking.(IANS)

Next Story

Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

0
water
Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

water
Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

water
Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)