Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Girls who are maltreated show higher levels of inflammation at an early age.Girls who are maltreated show higher levels of inflammation at an early age. Unsplash

Girls who are maltreated show higher levels of inflammation at an early age than boys who are maltreated or children who have not experienced abuse, say researchers.

Child maltreatment is behaviour towards a child that is outside the norms of conduct and entails substantial risk of causing physical or emotional harm.


Four types of maltreatment are generally recognized: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse (psychological abuse), and neglect.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychobiology, may forecast chronic mental and physical health problems in midlife.

The researchers examined the link between abuse and low-grade inflammation during childhood.

Inflammation plays a role in many chronic diseases of aging — diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, obesity — as well as mental health outcomes, and the findings suggest that the maltreatment’s association with inflammation does not lie dormant before emerging in adulthood.


Four types of maltreatment are generally recognized: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse (psychological abuse), and neglect. Unsplash

Instead, the study shows that traumatic experiences have a much more immediate impact.

“What our study highlights is that, even as early as childhood, we can see that a substantial portion of the children have levels of inflammation,” said study author Katherine Ehrlich from the University of Georgia in the US.

This suggests that these children may be at risk for significant health problems at an earlier age than their non-maltreated peers.

Participants in the study included 155 children aged 8-12 from low-income backgrounds who attended a weeklong day camp. The sample was racially diverse and included maltreated and non-maltreated children.

Researchers captured detailed information on children’s exposure to abuse.

Want to read more in Hindi? Checkout: आसियान देशों के 1000 छात्र आईआईटी में कर सकेंगे पीएचडी

The children-documented experiences included neglect (55 per cent), emotional maltreatment (67 per cent), physical abuse (35 per cent) and sexual abuse (8 per cent).

Many children experienced more than one type of abuse, and 35 per cent of children experienced abuse across multiple developmental periods.


Results revealed that childhood maltreatment, for girls, was associated with higher levels of low-grade inflammation in late childhood. Unsplash

The team measured five biomarkers of low-grade inflammation using non-fasting blood samples from the children. Results revealed that childhood maltreatment — for girls — was associated with higher levels of low-grade inflammation in late childhood.

Girls who had been abused over multiple periods or had multiple kinds of exposures had the highest levels of inflammation.

Also Read: Cows Prefer Face-to-Face Chat With Humans: Study

The findings showed that girls’ greatest risk for elevated inflammation emerged when they were abused early in life, before the age of five.

For boys in the study, exposure to maltreatment was not reflected in the higher levels of inflammation, but researchers cautioned against drawing conclusions without additional research targeted to boys. (IANS)


Popular

Wikimedia Commons

The most popular version of the rhyme/lullaby

As children, singing the rhyme Rock A Bye Baby was a fun thing to do. It was a statement of thrill and adventure to imagine a child climbing to the top of a tree and rocking to sleep. Especially in the Indian context, rocking a baby to sleep by attaching the cradle to the tree is quite a common thing. But the origin of this rhyme, or lullaby, seems rooted in other histories.

The most popular notion associated with this lullaby is of women leaving their babies tied to tree branches, rocking to sleep with the wind. It is believed that at the time this lullaby was written, it was inspired by a coloniser who saw the Native American women tie their children in birch bark cradles to the trees. The babies went to sleep rocked by the gusts of wind while the parents went about their tasks.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

This image released by Disney Theatrical Productions shows, from second left, Michael James Scott as Genie, Michael Maliakel as Aladdin, and Shoba Narayan as Jasmine after a performance of the Broadway musical "Aladdin" in New York on Sept. 28, 2021

As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — "Aladdin." Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them.

That shared love has gone full-circle this month as Narayan and Maliakel lead the Broadway company of the musical "Aladdin" out of the pandemic, playing Princess Jasmine and the hero from the title, respectively.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

Bottles of Jack Daniel's whiskeys are displayed at Rossi's Deli in San Francisco

Jack Daniel's is the world's most popular whiskey brand, but until recently, few people knew the liquor was created by Nathan "Nearest" Green, an enslaved Black man who mentored Daniel.

"We've always known," says Debbie Staples, a great-great-granddaughter of Green's who heard the story from her grandmother. … "He made the whiskey, and he taught Jack Daniel. And people didn't believe it … it's hurtful. I don't know if it was because he was a Black man."

Keep reading... Show less