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New Malware Can Fake Incoming Calls to Steal Banking Details: Kaspersky

A new banking trojan can insert fake text messages and obtain banking credentials

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banking malware
A new version of the Ginp banking Trojan that can insert fake text messages into the Inbox of a regular SMS app in a bid to obtain banking credentials of unsuspecting users. Pixabay

Researchers at cybersecurity firm Kaspersky have identified a new version of the Ginp banking Trojan that can insert fake text messages into the Inbox of a regular SMS app in a bid to obtain banking credentials of unsuspecting users.

The malware urges victims to open their banking apps with SMS and push notifications, then overlays these apps and steals banking credentials.

These messages appear under the guise of reputable vendors informing users about an undesired event like blocked account access.

To prevent this, the user is requested to open the application. Once victims do that, the Trojan overlays the original window and asks them to input the credentials for a credit card or a bank account. As a result, their payment details are handed over to cybercriminals.

banking malware
The malware urges victims to open their banking apps with SMS and push notifications, then overlays these apps and steals banking credentials. Pixabay

“Ginp is simple, but efficient – and effective. And the rate at which it evolves and acquires new capabilities is concerning. While this attack has so far only been seen in Spain, based on our previous experience, this Trojan could begin to emerge in other countries as well; Android users need to be on alert,” Alexander Eremin, security expert at Kaspersky, said in a statement.

Having infiltrated a phone, most mobile banking Trojans try to gain access to SMS messages. They do so to intercept one-time confirmation codes from banks. Armed with such a code, the malware owners can make a payment or siphon off funds without the victim noticing.

At the same time, many mobile Trojans use text messages to infect more devices by sending the victim’s contacts a bad download link.

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Some malicious apps are more creative, using SMS access to distribute other things in your name, such as offensive text messages.

The Ginp malware can even create incoming texts on the victim’s phone that no one actually sent, Eremin said. (IANS)

Next Story

Most Organisations Experience Cyber Threats During Coronavirus Pandemic: Checkpoint Survey

Cybercriminals will always seek to capitalise on the latest trends to try and boost the success rates of attacks, and the coronavirus pandemic has created a perfect storm of a global news event together with dramatic changes in working practices and the technologies used by organisations

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Cyber Threat
In phishing attacks, a bad actor steals sensitive information by tricking people to open an email, instant message, or text message containing malicious links or attachments. Pixabay

 Most organisations have seen a rise in security threats and attacks during the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey by cybersecurity firm Check Point said on Tuesday.

While 71 per cent of those IT and security professionals who were surveyed reported an increase in security threats or attacks, 61 per cent of respondents said they were concerned about security risks of changes made to enable remote work.

Phishing attempts (55 per cent) and websites claiming helpful information on coronavirus (32 per cent) have emerged as the leading threats to the organisations, the respondents said. In phishing attacks, a bad actor steals sensitive information by tricking people to open an email, instant message, or text message containing malicious links or attachments.

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The findings showed that the rapid changes to enterprise working practices, and broader concerns about the pandemic, are both being exploited by cybercriminals as they step up their attacks, generating a raft of new challenges for security professionals.

“Cybercriminals will always seek to capitalise on the latest trends to try and boost the success rates of attacks, and the coronavirus pandemic has created a perfect storm of a global news event together with dramatic changes in working practices and the technologies used by organisations,” said Rafi Kretchmer Check Point’s Head of Product Marketing.

Cybersecurity
Most organisations have seen a rise in security threats and attacks during the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey by cybersecurity firm Check Point said on Tuesday. Pixabay

“This has meant a significant increase in the attack surface of many organizations, which is compromising their security postures. To ensure security and business continuity in this rapidly evolving situation, organizations need to protect themselves with a holistic, end-to-end security architecture,” Kretchmer added.

The survey was conducted in a bid to examine the severity of impact coronavirus has had on enterprise security. It involved 411 IT and security professions — all from organisations over 500 people. As many enterprises rely on Zoom to facilitate their employees working from home, Check Point recently saw a spike in the number of “Zoom” domains registered and spotted malicious “Zoom” files targeting people working from home.

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Check Point documented 1,700 new “Zoom” domains registered since the advent of pandemic, 25 per cent of which were registered in the past week days, and has deemed 70 domains as suspicious. (IANS)