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Young Man Finds 4,000 Year Old Ancient Dagger by Accident in Slovakia

The dagger, in good condition condition, is 24.5 cm in length and 320 grams in weight.

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Ancient dagger
The dagger, discovered by accident, can reveal new secrets about the European Bronze Age. (representational image) Pixabay
  • The ancient dagger was found by ‘accident’ alongside a river
  • Archaeologists believe the dagger belongs to early Central European Bronze Age

Slovakia, August 19, 2017: An ancient dagger almost 4,000-year-old from the Bronze Age was accidentally found in Hlohovec town of Slovakia, the media reported on Wednesday.

A fresh graduate named David found the antique by chance during a grill party near the Vah river, which runs through the town in Trnava Region, Xinhua news agency reported.

“It’s a bronze blade that was a symbol of power or requirement to some status. Not everyone could afford it,” archaeologist Matus Sladok said.

The dagger, still in good condition, is 24.5 cm in length and 320 grams in weight.

The upper part is engraved with branches and the bottom has three openings for the blade to attach to a stick.

Daggers on a stick are linked with the Unetice culture at the start of the Central European Bronze Age roughly 4,000 years ago.

This culture today is mainly known from sites in Slovakia and Czech Republic.

The riverbank where the dagger was found was probably not the original spot to place it, according to Sladok.

“It probably moved with time.”

Four such daggers have been known of in Slovakia until now. (IANS)

 

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Bronze Age gold workers in Ireland made artifacts from imported material, says a study

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London: Archaeologists have found evidence of an ancient gold trade route, dating to the early Bronze Age (2500 BC), between the southwest of Britain and Ireland.

Using a new technique to measure the chemical composition of some of the earliest gold artifacts in Ireland, the researchers determined that the objects were actually made from gold imported from Cornwall in Britain.

“This is an unexpected and particularly interesting result as it suggests that Bronze Age gold workers in Ireland were making artifacts out of material sourced from outside of the country, despite the existence of a number of easily-accessible and rich gold deposits found locally,” said lead author Chris Standish from University of Southampton in Britain.

“It is unlikely that knowledge of how to extract gold did not exist in Ireland, as we see large scale exploitation of other metals. It is more probable that an ‘exotic’ origin was cherished as a key property of gold and was an important reason behind why it was imported for production,” Standish said.

The researchers used an advanced technique called laser ablation mass spectrometry to sample gold from 50 early Bronze Age artifacts in the collections of the National Museum of Ireland, such as basket ornaments, discs and lunula (necklaces).

They measured isotopes of lead in tiny fragments and made a comparison with the composition of gold deposits found in a variety of locations.

After further analysis, the archaeologists concluded that the gold in the objects most likely originates from Cornwall, rather than Ireland — possibly extracted and traded as part of the tin mining industry.

The study appeared in the journal Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society. (IANS)