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Many Commercial Films Worldwide Continue to Express Womanhood in Stereotypical Manner than Men

For the findings, the research team proposed an advanced system that used computer vision technology to automatically analyses

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Commercial, Films, Worldwide
Our research confirmed that many commercial films depict women from a stereotypical perspective. Pixabay

Many commercial films worldwide continue to express womanhood in a stereotypical manner than men, said a new study.

According to the researchers, women were found be more prone to expressing passive emotions, such as sadness, fear and surprise.

In contrast, male characters in the same films were more likely to demonstrate active emotions, such as anger and hatred.

“Our research confirmed that many commercial films depict women from a stereotypical perspective,” said the study’s author Byungjoo Lee, a professor at the KAIST College in South Korea.

Commercial, Films, Worldwide
According to the researchers, women were found be more prone to expressing passive emotions, such as sadness, fear and surprise. Pixabay

For the findings, the research team proposed an advanced system that used computer vision technology to automatically analyses the visual information of each frame of a film.

This allowed the system to more accurately and practically evaluate the degrees to which female and male characters were discriminatingly depicted in a film in quantitative terms and further enabled the revealing of gender bias that conventional analysis methods could not yet detect.

The researchers analysed 40 films from Hollywood and South Korea released between 2017 and 2018.

They downsampled the films from 24 to 3 frames per second and used Microsoft’s Face API facial recognition technology and object detection technology YOLO9000 to verify the details of the characters and their surrounding objects in the scenes.

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Using the new system, the team computed eight quantitative indices that described the representation of a particular gender in the films.

They were: Emotional diversity, spatial staticity, spatial occupancy, temporal occupancy, mean age, intellectual image, emphasis on appearance, and type and frequency of surrounding objects.

The type and frequency of surrounding objects index revealed that female characters and automobiles were tracked together only 55.7 per cent as much as that of male characters, while they were more likely to appear with furniture and in a household, with 123.9 per cent probability.

In cases of temporal occupancy and mean age, female characters appeared less frequently in films than male at the rate of 56 per cent, and were on an average younger in 79.1 per cent of the cases.

Commercial, Films, Worldwide
In contrast, male characters in the same films were more likely to demonstrate active emotions, such as anger and hatred. Pixabay

These two indices were especially conspicuous in Korean films.

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The study is scheduled to be presented at the 22nd ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW) in Texas on November 11. (IANS)

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Anil Kapoor: I Need To Learn How To Go Easy On Myself

Actor Anil Kapoor says that he needs to learn to go easy on himself

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Actor Anil Kapoor
Anil Kapoor says that he has always been his worst critic. Wikimedia Commons.

After four decades in Bollywood, Anil Kapoor feels he needs to learn how to go easy on himself, and that is his biggest challenge. The actor says he has always been his worst critic.

Anil entered the industry with a small role in 1979 with Umesh Mehra’s “Hamare Tumhare”, and then went on to carve his niche by balancing his stature as a respectable actor and his popularity as a saleable star, with performances including “Woh 7 Din”, “1942: A Love Story”, “Mr. India”, “Tezaab”, “Ram Lakhan”, “Lamhe”, “Beta”, “Taal”, “Nayak: The Real Hero” and “Pukar”.

At 62, he has managed to keep himself relevant in the forever fickle world of Bollywood showbiz, and his fit and sprightly persona defies his age. Anil insists his constant struggle is to go easy on himself.

“I’ve always been hard on myself and I’m always my own worst critic. So my biggest challenge continues to learn to go easy on myself and to let go when I need to,” Anil told IANS.

He says his career goals continue to be the same as they were all those years ago, when he was starting out.

“Strangely enough, my goals haven’t changed much! I’m a simple man with a simple plan — to be better than I was yesterday. So that’s what I continue to strive towards,” said the actor.

Anil Kapoor
Anil Kapoor feels that Cinema is the most engaging way in which stories are told. Wikimedia Commons

If anything, he has managed to stay relevant by experimenting with his craft and subjects, as trends changed in Bollywood over the past 40 years.

There have been the international forays, too. He featured in Danny Boyle’s Oscar-wiing global blockbuster “Slumdog Millionaire”, and also worked in “24”, “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol” and “Family Guy”.

His versatility is proved by the fact that he was equally at home in these international projects as he was in out-and-out Bollywood outings as “No Entry”, “Welcome”, “Race”, “Dil Dhadakne Do”, “Mubarakan”, “Fanney Khan”, “Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga” and “Total Dhamaal”.

“I’ve always believed that change is the only constant. So, I have let life and opportunities change me along the way, in the most organic ways possible. The only thing that hasn’t changed is the passion I feel for my work,” said the actor, who recently became part of a panel discussion by Royal Stag Barrel Select Large Short Films in Kolkata to decode “what makes films powerful”, as part of a six-city tour.

Royal Stag Barrel Select Large Short Films brings stars together to talk about the power of cinema and the short film genre. The panel discussion in Kolkata was moderated by Anupama Chopra, and also included Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra, Vinay Pathak, Sheetal Menon, Bejoy Nambiar and Niranjan Iyengar.

“Cinema is perhaps the most engaging way in which stories are told and shared”, he said, adding: “And stories have always had the power to shape minds and lives.”

The actor points out that power comes with a sense of responsibility.

Anil Kapoor
Anil Kapoor along with ‘Shootout at Wadala’ cast at a promotional event. Wikimedia Commons

“Anyone in a position to influence minds and hearts has a responsibility towards the people they are reaching. Not everyone is fortunate enough to have the right platform and a mouthpiece to communicate with the world, so when you do, it comes with the duty to be mindful of the message you’re sharing and affirming,” said the father of three.

Anil will be back on the big screen in Anees Bazmee’s “Pagalpanti”, with whom he has in the past worked in “No Entry”, “Welcome”, “No Problem”, “Welcome Back” and “Mubarakan”.

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“Pagalpanti” also stars John Abraham, Arshad Warsi, Pulkit Samrat, Ileana D’Cruz, Kriti Kharbanda, Urvashi Rautela and Saurabh Shukla, and is slated to release on November 22.

The film is produced by Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar’s T-Series and Kumar Mangat Pathak and Abhishek Pathak’s Panorama Studios and co-produced by Vinod Bhanushali, Shiv Chanana, Aditya Chowksey and Sanjeev Joshi. (Bollywood Country)