Saturday August 24, 2019

Marijuana Considered Safe to Cure Epilepsy in Kids

While the study's authors said the results were significant, they stressed that the purpose of this study was about safety not efficacy

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Marijuana
Marijuana safe to treat epilepsy in kids: Study. Pixabay

Consuming a marijuana-based drug may be safe in treating children with severe epilepsy, results of a clinical trial has showed.

Following treatment with cannabidiol — a non-psychoactive compound found in marijuana — about one in five children were described as much or very much improved from their baseline, while around half reported none, or a very slight improvement, Xinhua news agency reported.

While the trial was conducted on a small group of children with severe epilepsy, it showed that the drug had a manageable side effect profile, but only showed extensive symptom relief for a brief number of patients.

The trial “involved the sickest children with epilepsy — children who are having seizures many times per day, who have been recently hospitalized for their epilepsy, and have failed on average about nine anti-epilepsy drugs before,” said lead author John Lawson, paediatric neurologist at Sydney’s Children’s Hospital.

Here is another article on healing properties of Marijuana by CBD Oil Room

“The main aim of the study was about safety. We found that there were a few safety concerns but overall those safety issues were very manageable and the drug overall was very safe for the majority,” he added.

Marijuana
Marijuana leaves. Pixabay

The study was published in the Medical Journal of Australia.

Although legally cannabis must be prescribed by a doctor, recent reports of cannabis derivatives being successful in treating children with epilepsy have led to a number of parents of sick children sourcing their own medical marijuana.

While the study’s authors said the results were significant, they stressed that the purpose of this study was about safety not efficacy.

Also Read: Oldest Known Rocks Evolved on Earth Are Result of Asteroids, Research Reveals

The US Food and Drug Administration had recently approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy — Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome — in patients two years of age and older. (IANS)

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Study: Young People Post on Social Media Under the Influence of Drugs and then Regret Later on

Separately, black participants were at a much lower risk for these activities

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drugs, social media
Compared to users of other drugs, current marijuana users were at the highest risk for engaging in these risky behaviours while high, followed by current cocaine users. Pixabay

Posting on social media, texting or calling while high on drugs is prevalent among young people, and many say that they regret this behaviour later, researchers said. “Risky social media posts, including those showing people high on drugs, have the potential to cause embarrassment, stress and conflict for users and those in their social networks,” said study lead author Joseph Palamar, Associate Professor at New York University.

“It can also have adverse implications for one’s career, since the majority of employers now use social media platforms to screen job candidates and may search for evidence of substance use,” he added. Published in the journal Substance Abuse, the study points to the potential social harm associated with substance use which are likely overlooked and go beyond well-established health risks. For the study, the researchers examined data from 872 adults surveyed while entering electronic dance music (EDM) parties in New York City who reported current or previous drug use.

The researchers estimate that more than a third of EDM attendees (34.3 per cent) posted on social media while high, with 21.4 per cent regretting it. In addition, more than half (55.9 per cent) had texted or called someone while high, with 30.5 per cent regretting making a call or sending a text. Nearly half (47.6 per cent) had been in a photo while high, with 32.7 per cent regretting it.

drugs, social media
Females and young adults (aged 18-24) were particularly at an elevated risk for posting on social media while high and were also more likely to text, make calls, and take photos while high. Pixabay

“At least one in five experienced regret after engaging in these behaviours while high, suggesting that some situations may have resulted in socially harmful or embarrassing scenarios,” Palamar said. Females and young adults (aged 18-24) were particularly at an elevated risk for posting on social media while high and were also more likely to text, make calls, and take photos while high.

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Although young adults are a known high-risk demographic for substance use, females are typically at lower risk than males. However, research shows that females are more likely to use social media. EDM attendees who identified as neither heterosexual, nor gay, nor bisexual were also at a higher risk for social media posting and related behaviours while high.

Separately, black participants were at a much lower risk for these activities. Compared to users of other drugs, current marijuana users were at the highest risk for engaging in these risky behaviours while high, followed by current cocaine users. (IANS)