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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Set to Face Leadership Vote

Stamos said Zuckerberg needs to give up some of his control of Facebook and hire a new CEO

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2020, Facebook
FILE - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at a Facebook developer conference in San Jose, California, May 1, 2018. VOA
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was likely to face a leadership vote at the social networking giant’s annual general meeting on Thursday to step down as Chairman.
According to the BBC, Zuckerberg was “unlikely to lose the vote because he owns 60 per cent of the company’s shares”.
“However, the percentage of shareholders who vote against him could indicate how much faith they have in his leadership,” said the report on Thursday.
Trillium Asset Management that owns about $7 million worth of Facebook shares is one of those advocating for Zuckerberg to step down.
The chorus is growing against Zuckerberg to step down as Chairman as the company under his leadership has failed to curb privacy violations.
Facebook
Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg. VOA
Zuckerberg has rejected the call for breaking up his company.
In an interview with French broadcaster France 2, Zuckerberg dismissed the claim made by his long-time friend and Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes that it is time to break up Facebook as Zuckerberg has yielded “unchecked power and influence far beyond that of anyone else in the private sector or in government”.
Former Facebook security chief Alex Stamos has also asked Zuckerberg to step down.
Stamos said Zuckerberg needs to give up some of his control of Facebook and hire a new CEO. (IANS)

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Facebook Ready to Launch a Dedicated News Tab on its Platform

Zuckerberg last week stressed that his platform has now become a 'Fifth Estate' in the world alongside traditional news media and people no longer have to rely on traditional gatekeepers in politics or media to make their voices heard

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Corporate, America, Climate Change
FILE - In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook stickers are laid out on a table at F8, Facebook's developer conference in San Jose, Calif. The Boston-based renewable energy developer Longroad Energy announced in May that Facebook is building a… VOA

Calling itself a ‘Fifth Estate’, Facebook has reportedly entered into deals with prominent media houses to launch a dedicated news tab on its platform.

According to the Wall Street Journal, publications like News Corp, Dow Jones, New York Post, the Washington Post and others will help the social networking platform ramp up its ambition to become a news player.

“The New York Times has been in talks with Facebook, but a spokeswoman for the paper declined to comment on whether it had reached a deal,” the report said on Sunday.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg spoke about a news section on its platform in April.

Also Read: Absence of Google Apps Hurting Huawei the Most

The section would reportedly be free for users, though Facebook might pay publishers whose work is featured.

Facebook is in talks with news publishers to offer as much as $3 million for the rights to publish content on its upcoming news tab.

facebook, WhatsApp, stories, feature
An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

“It’s important to me that we help people get trustworthy news and find solutions that help journalists around the world do their important work,” Zuckerberg wrote in a recent post.

Facebook could “potentially have a direct relationship with publishers to make sure that their content is available, if it is really a high-quality content”, he added.

Algorithms and human editors will decide what new content will appear for the users.AThere will be a breaking news section with 10 of the “top” stories of the moment.

Facebook has announced other initiatives to support journalists, including a pledge to invest $300 million in local newsrooms and grants for people with ideas to improve the quality of news.

Zuckerberg last week stressed that his platform has now become a ‘Fifth Estate’ in the world alongside traditional news media and people no longer have to rely on traditional gatekeepers in politics or media to make their voices heard.

“People no longer have to rely on traditional gatekeepers in politics or media to make their voices heard, and that has important consequences,” he said. (IANS)