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Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, Sundar Pichai Make their Way to the Top 100 CEOs List

It may be recalled that when Glassdoor first started ranking CEOs back in 2013, Zuckerberg was ranked the number one CEO in the US, with a 99 per cent approval rating

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Facebook's founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at the Viva Tech start-up and technology summit in Paris, France, May 24, 2018. VOA

Social media giant Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has dropped from his 2018 rank of number 16 to number 55 on the list of top Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) in the US this year.

A total of 27 CEOs from the tech industry made it to the job and recruiting site Glassdoor’s annual list of CEOs from top companies, news website CNET reported late on Tuesday.

According to the report, Zuckerberg lagged behind Google CEO Sundar Pichai, who also received a 94 per cent CEO approval rating but came in 46th place overall.

On the other hand, the Facebook CEO still managed to came ahead of Apple CEO Tim Cook, whose approval rating was 92 per cent, securing him the 69th spot on the list.

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FILE -Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the keynote address of the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., May 7, 2019. VOA

However, Cook is one of only two CEOs to remain in the top 100 for all seven years along with Zuckerberg.

Other technology CEOs like Adobe’s Shantanu Narayen and Microsoft’s Satya Nadella bagged the coveted fifth and sixth spots in the list gaining an employee approval rating of 98 per cent each.

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It may be recalled that when Glassdoor first started ranking CEOs back in 2013, Zuckerberg was ranked the number one CEO in the US, with a 99 per cent approval rating. (IANS)

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Accepts That The Social media Giant May Have To Pay Excessive Taxes

Zuckerberg will tell the conference that he's glad that that the OECD is looking at tax reform, which Facebook also wants

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Mark Zukerberg
The billionaire social network founder is due to meet members of the European Union's executive Commission in Brussels and speak at the Munich Security Conference in Germany. VOA

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg plans to throw his support behind international reforms that would require Silicon Valley tech giants to pay more tax in Europe.

The billionaire social network founder is due to meet members of the European Union’s executive Commission in Brussels and speak at the Munich Security Conference in Germany.

Zuckerberg is expected to tell the conference  that he’s backing plans for digital tax reform on a global scale proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. According to an excerpt of his speech provided in advance, Zuckerberg will say, “I understand that there’s frustration about how tech companies are taxed in Europe.”

Zuckerberg will tell the conference that he’s glad that that the OECD is looking at tax reform, which Facebook also wants. “And we accept that may mean we have to pay more tax and pay it in different places under a new framework,” Zuckerberg will reportedly say.

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Mark Zuckerberg Accepts That Facebook May Have to Pay More Taxes. VOA

The OECD plans would require digital and internet companies, including social media platforms, to pay more tax in countries where they have significant consumer-facing activities and generate profits.

The current system for taxing multinationals is based on where they are physically located, which sees internet companies such as Facebook pay the majority of their tax in the United States. The situation is even more complicated in the European Union, where multinationals largely pay taxes on business done across the region in the one country that serves as their EU base, often a low-tax haven.

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Tech companies have faced criticism for not paying enough tax in come countries. The U.S., meanwhile, has criticized the OECD plans, arguing they discriminate against big Silicon Valley companies. (VOA)