Saturday November 23, 2019

Here’s How Marriage Can Protect You From Malnutrition in Old Age

According Volkert, a lack of appetite, which is often perceived as a key cause of malnutrition, was of no relevance.

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Marriage
Bad husband and perfect father | Should I divorce such a man?

While malnutrition can occur at any age, elderly people, aged 65 and above, who are particularly prone to it can safeguard themselves with marriage, according to a study.

The findings showed that people who are unmarried, separated or divorced are most often affected, whilst men and women who are either married or widowed tend to take better care of themselves.

The consequences of malnutrition are manifold. They range from weight loss to a weakened immune system or functional impairment of muscles and all organs. The body falls back on all its reserves.

“The older the people are, the more likely it is that they will suffer from malnutrition. The risk increases a little with every year that passes,” said Dorothee Volkert, from Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) in Germany.

“Malnutrition in the elderly appears to be caused by a surprisingly narrow range of factors. Only age, marital status, difficulties with walking and coping with stairs and stays in hospital had a significant role to play,” Volkert added.

Marriage
Married couple. Pixabay

In the study, appearing in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the team set out to explore which of a total of 23 variables — ranging from aspects such as difficulties with chewing and swallowing or cognitive impairments to loneliness and depression or moving into a care home — were decisive for malnutrition.

The researchers took six existing sets of data which included 4,844 participants, aged between 72 and 85, from Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

Also Read- Exercising Too Little Puts Your Health At Risk: WHO

According Volkert, a lack of appetite, which is often perceived as a key cause of malnutrition, was of no relevance.

She recommended carrying out further studies to obtain a common definition of malnutrition. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Your Grandmothers Dislike Wearing A Fitness Band

Grandmas may hate wearing smart watches not just to be tech savvy

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Grandmoms dislikes fitness band
There are many reasons as to why Older ladies do not prefer wearing a fitness band. Pixabay

If your grandmother does not like to wear a fitness band or a smart watch, there are deeper reasons than just being tech-savvy. According to researchers, older adults wish to remain active together in a group, not competing with their peers while being in the park.

While counterintuitive, engaging in competition with family and friends decreases the odds of long-term use among older adults, perhaps because they feel it’s demotivating, according to researchers from Michigan State University.

And wanting to lose weight, become more active and monitor health doesn’t seem to influence length of use either. But technological savviness does.

“For older adults, motivation is about partnership and collaboration, such as walking together,” said Anastasia Kononova, assistant professor of advertising. “It’s about being active together, not competing.”

Fitness band
Older adults dislike wearing fitness band as the physical appearance of such devices doesn’t matter to them. Pixabay

The researchers conducted a survey of adults age 65 and older to explore factors associated with long-term use — longer than six months — of wearable activity trackers.

They looked at usage patterns, socioeconomic factors, health status and activity levels.

The study, published in the journal Telemedicine and e-HEALTH, found older adults are likely to use trackers longer if they use a wider variety of functions to track their health and activity levels.

Examples of such functions include tracking calories burned, distance, heart rate, mood, sleep time, steps, etc.

Other factors determining long-term use: being female, being well-educated, wearing every day, exercising regularly and not having chronic health conditions.

Also Read- For U.S. Military Veterans, Apple Providing Health Records On iPhones

“For starters, manufacturers should incorporate activities specific to an older population, such as swimming and gardening, into trackers,” Kononova said.

Like younger users, physical appearance of trackers is important, so big and bulky doesn’t work.

“Wearable activity trackers have the potential to improve older adults’ health, yet many adopters don’t use them on a long-term basis,” said Lin Li, a doctoral candidate studying health and technology who led the study. (IANS)