Monday October 21, 2019
Home Lead Story How Masculini...

How Masculinity is Used as Currency to Buy Sperm Donor’s Time

Sperm banks are able to procure sperm for free as long as they sell it as a way to affirm the masculinity of donors

0
//
To overcome regulatory constraints and increase donor numbers, sperm banks in the UK and Australia began to market the act of donating sperm as a confirmation of masculinity. Pixabay

Sperm banks often use images and phrases associated with masculinity to procure sperm for free, new research has found.

“It’s interesting that sperm banks are able to procure sperm for free as long as they sell it as a way to affirm the masculinity of donors, especially in today’s context when the notion of masculinity is constantly challenged,” said study lead author Laetitia Mimoun, Professor at the University of London.

Globally, the sperm donation industry is valued at over $3.5 billion.

After analysing marketing strategies of sperm banks in the UK and Australia, the research team found they relied on masculine archetypes to create value for a commodity they couldn’t buy legally.

Masculinity, Currency, Sperm Donors'
Sperm banks often use images and phrases associated with masculinity to procure sperm for free. Flickr

“This is to say if you give your sperm you are a real man and you are better than all the other men who cannot do so for whatever reason,” Mimoun said.

To overcome regulatory constraints and increase donor numbers, sperm banks in the UK and Australia began to market the act of donating sperm as a confirmation of masculinity. This strategy relied on two archetypes of masculinity — the ‘soldier’ serving their country and the ‘everyday hero’ saving a damsel in distress, said Mimoun.

The researchers found campaigns employing the everyday hero archetype sometimes used hyper-sexualised or romanticised images of men to intensify their appeal.

Examples of this are found in campaign posters showing athletically built men in swimming trunks or underpants, but also in videos depicting men cooking barbecues or handing out roses to women.

Also Read- Bengaluru Doctor Hema Divakar gets Global Asian Award

The use of these marketing strategies had significant impacts on the sperm donation industries in both the UK and Australia, Mimoun said.

The study was published in the journal Marketing Theory. (IANS)

Next Story

Under Time Pressure to Answer, People may Lie to you by Responding with Socially Desirable Answer

The idea has always been that we have a divided mind -- an intuitive, animalistic type and a more rational type

0
Time, Pressure, Answer
The method of 'answer quickly and without thinking', a long staple in psychological research, may be doing many things, but one thing it does is make people lie to you and tell you what they think you want to hear. Pixabay

When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively – be it at work or home – people may lie to you by responding with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, say researchers.

In other words, time pressure does not bring out a person’s good ‘true self’ and people may default to their desire to appear virtuous even if it means misrepresenting themselves.

“The method of ‘answer quickly and without thinking’, a long staple in psychological research, may be doing many things, but one thing it does is make people lie to you and tell you what they think you want to hear,” said John Protzko, a cognitive scientist at University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

The idea has always been that we have a divided mind — an intuitive, animalistic type and a more rational type.

Time, Pressure, Answer
In other words, time pressure does not bring out a person’s good ‘true self’ and people may default to their desire to appear virtuous even if it means misrepresenting themselves. Pixabay

“The more rational type is assumed to always be constraining the lower order mind. If you ask people to answer quickly and without thinking, it’s supposed to give you sort of a secret access to that lower order mind,” Protzko explained in a paper published in the journal Psychological Science.

To test this assumption, Protzko and UCSB colleague Jonathan Schooler devised a test of 10 simple yes-or-no questions.

Through a survey, respondents were asked to take fewer than 11 seconds, or alternatively, more than 11 seconds to answer each question.

They found that the fast-answering group was more likely to give socially-desirable answers, while the slow answers and the ones who were not given any time constraints (fast or slow) were less likely to do so.

Also Read- Unused Coffee Bean Extracts can Reduce Fat-Induced Inflammation in Cells

The team plans to examine previous studies that used the quick-answer technique to see how much results might be driven by participants giving socially-desirable answers. (IANS)