Thursday November 14, 2019
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Opt For Masking To Get Flawless Skin

There are various masks that can be used according to the skin type: -

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Opt for masking for flawless skin. Pixabay

As much as the holiday season is all about fun and joy accompanied by overindulgence, it also means an adverse impact on the skin via the combination of alcohol, sugar and little sleep. Therefore no matter what the skin type is, it needs to be pampered and taken care of and a great fix in our busy lives is the facemask.

Neha Rawla, Brand Communication for Forest Essentials elaborates that just as the origins of most beauty rituals can be traced back to the Indian subcontinent, so can be the origin of the application of face masks, also known as Lepana in Sanskrit.

“Different Lepas or masks for maintaining ageless skin, increasing hydration levels, smoothing skin’s imperfections as well as toning and firming skin are mentioned under the ancient art of Lepana in Ayurveda,” said Rawla.

Sangeeta Velaskar, Vice President and Head, Medical Services & R & D from Kaya Limited added that “The facial sheet masks particularly are great for everyday use for instant glow and freshness. It is not a substitute for your everyday skin care regime, but it surely adds to the effect”.

There are various masks that can be used according to the skin type: –

* Cream masks: They are suitable for normal to dry skin types and provide them the required moisture, hydration and softness. This in turn makes the skin healthier, plumper, smoother, tighter and firm.

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Use a tea tree extract night mask to keep your skin hydrated even at night. Pixabay

* Clay masks: Best suited for oily or acne prone skin, these masks naturally detoxify the skin as they hydrate without oil. They are the best to treat clogged pores and congestion as they remove impurities while mattifying the texture and minimizing the pores. These masks balance the oil levels and regulate the oil secretion on the skins surface, along with smoothening and softening the skin by removing the dust build up on it.

* Gel masks: Ideal for sensitive and dehydrated skin types, these masks are gentle and lightweight. Along with calming and hydrating they also play a role in firming and tightening the skin.

* Sheet masks: The most popular amongst the lot and definitely a rage these days. These masks are easy to use and are extremely convenient to handle. These suit almost every skin type and are available in many variants; thus the user needs to select accordingly. Made popular by the K Beauty trend, these masks are essentially used to hydrate the skin and reduce puffiness.

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* Exfoliating masks: Exfoliation is an important part of the skin care routine and is done once in a while to get rid of the dead skin cells, blackheads etc. These masks along with exfoliation also contain natural skin brightening agents. These are also suitable for all skin types, however those with sensitive skin should opt for the less abrasive ones.

Peel off masks: These provide an instant glow as they physically remove any dirt/dust or blackheads settled on the top layer of the skin. These masks are suitable for all skin types. (IANS)

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Skin Exposure to UVB Light Alters Gut Bacteria For Good: Study

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome

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UVB Light causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, it has so far been shown only in rodents. Pixabay

Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans — possibly via vitamin D which can help explain the protective role of UVB in inflammatory diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Sun exposure, vitamin D levels and the mix of bacteria in our gut are each associated with risk of inflammatory conditions like MS and IBD, said scientists from University of British Columbia.

Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome.

However, that UVB, therefore, causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, has so far been shown only in rodents.

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome.

Healthy female volunteers were given three, one-minute sessions of full-body UVB exposure in a single week.

Before and after treatment, stool samples were taken for analysis of gut bacteria – as well blood samples for vitamin D levels.

Skin UVB exposure significantly increased gut microbial diversity, but only in subjects who were not taking vitamin D supplements.

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Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome. Pixabay

“Prior to UVB exposure, these women had a less diverse and balanced gut microbiome than those taking regular vitamin D supplements,” reported Professor Bruce Vallance, who led the University of British Columbia study.

“UVB exposure boosted the richness and evenness of their microbiome to levels indistinguishable from the supplemented group, whose microbiome was not significantly changed”.

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the analysis suggests that vitamin D mediates the change — which could help explain the protective effect of UVB light in inflammatory diseases like MS and IBD.

The largest effect was an increase in the relative abundance of “Lachnospiraceae” bacteria after the UVB light exposures.

This indicates that vitamin D at least partly mediates UVB-induced gut microbiome changes.

The study is not designed to show the exact mechanism by which the microbiome changes occur, but both UVB and vitamin D are known to influence the immune system.

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Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans. Pixabay

“It is likely that exposure to UVB light somehow alters the immune system in the skin initially, then more systemically, which in turn affects how favourable the intestinal environment is for the different bacteria,” suggests Vallance.

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The results have implications for people who are undergoing UVB phototherapy, said scientists. (IANS)