Friday April 26, 2019
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Massive plantation drive in Ghaziabad aims for 31,000 trees

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A plantation drive in Ghaziabad. Photo credit: gurukultheschool.com

trees-in-parkGhaziabad: The Ghaziabad Development Authority (GDA) on Sunday launched a massive drive to plant 31,000 trees in the city.

The drive was launched in the city forest on the banks of Hindon river where GDA officials, members of civil defence and Paryavaran Sachetak Dal planted 3,000 trees.

“The city forest has emerged as the city’s lungs. It will be developed as the main picnic spot,” acting vice chairman of GDA Ravendra Madhukar Godbole said.

The GDA is planning to plant 2.6 lakh trees during this year and appealed to individuals, NGOs and corporate houses to come forward to make the city green.

(IANS)

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Rare Earth Metals in Smartphones Can Now Be Tracked

Extracting rare earths from the environment or from industrial samples, like waste water from mines or coal waste products, is generally very challenging and expensive.

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To develop the sensor, the researchers from Pennsylvania State University in the US used a protein they recently described and subsequently used to explore the biology of bacteria that use lanthanides. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new protein-based sensor that can detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, in a more efficient and cost-effective way.

The sensor changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals, according to the study published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The protein undergoes a shape change when it binds to lanthanides, which is key for the sensor’s fluorescence to “turn on”, said the study.

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“These elements are called rare earths, and they include chemical elements of atomic weight 57 to 71 on the periodic table,” Cotruvo added. Pixabay

To develop the sensor, the researchers from Pennsylvania State University in the US used a protein they recently described and subsequently used to explore the biology of bacteria that use lanthanides.

“Lanthanides are used in a variety of current technologies, including the screens and electronics of smartphones, batteries of electric cars, satellites, and lasers,” said Joseph Cotruvo, Assistant Professor at Penn State and senior author of the study.

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The sensor changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals, according to the study published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Pixabay

“These elements are called rare earths, and they include chemical elements of atomic weight 57 to 71 on the periodic table,” Cotruvo added.

Also Read: Talks With IMF To Lower Natural Gas Price, The New President in Ukraine Takes Charge

Extracting rare earths from the environment or from industrial samples, like waste water from mines or coal waste products, is generally very challenging and expensive.

“We developed a protein-based sensor that can detect tiny amounts of lanthanides in a sample, letting us know if it’s worth investing resources to extract these important metals,” Cotruvo said. (IANS)

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