Saturday April 20, 2019

Maternal Cannabis Use to Trigger Early Indulgence in Kids

The researchers also analysed the impacts of mother's marijuana use on child's cognitive skills, family's socio-economic position and social environment

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Cannabis-based drug may help in motor neuron disease: Lancet. pixabay

Children whose mothers use Cannabis are more likely to start smoking weed an average of two years earlier, which can lead to severe neuropsychiatric and social consequences, according to a new study.

The results, led by researchers from the Brown University in Rhode Island, US, suggested that mothers who used marijuana increased their children’s risk for its early use, at a median age of 16, as compared with age 18 for children whose mothers did not use the drug.

While marijuana has been recognised as a therapeutic benefit for a number of health conditions, including a safer alternative to opioids, it has been linked with negative consequences among children.

Early usage of cannabis may lead to conditions such as impairments in concentration and decision-making, increased impulsivity, as well as reductions in IQ.

The younger a child begins using marijuana, the more severe the effects would be. Therefore, delaying marijuana initiation may be an important public health goal, the researchers said.

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In this July 12, 2018 file photo, a newly-transplanted cannabis cuttings grow in pots at a medical marijuana cultivation facility in Massachusetts. (VOA)

“Beginning marijuana use at a young age has been linked with negative cognitive and behavioural consequences,” said Natasha Sokol, a postdoctoral student at the varsity.

“It’s important to better understand how these changes may impact children’s early marijuana use so that we can better identify at-risk youth and implement effective prevention strategies,” she added.

For the study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the team assessed the timing and extent of marijuana use and initiation among 4,440 children and 2,586 mothers.

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They tested the effect of a mother’s marijuana use between a child’s birth and age 12 on that child’s subsequent risk of marijuana initiation and controlling for factors related to the child’s early life behaviour.

The researchers also analysed the impacts of mother’s marijuana use on child’s cognitive skills, family’s socio-economic position and social environment. (IANS)

Next Story

Regular Pot Smokers May Need Higher Dosage for Sedation: Study

Cannabis use in the United States increased 43 per cent between 2007 and 2015. An estimated 13.5 per cent of the adult population used cannabis during this period, with the greatest increase recorded among people 26 and older

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An employee inspects the leaf of a cannabis plant at a medical marijuana plantation in northern Israel. (VOA)

People who regularly use cannabis may require more than two times the usual level of sedation when undergoing medical procedures, warns a new study.

“Some of the sedative medications have dose-dependent side effects, meaning the higher the dose, the greater likelihood for problems,” said lead researcher Mark Twardowski from Western Medical Associates in Colorado, US.

“That becomes particularly dangerous when suppressed respiratory function is a known side effect,” Twardowski added.

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In this July 12, 2018 file photo, a newly-transplanted cannabis cuttings grow in pots at a medical marijuana cultivation facility in Massachusetts. (VOA)

For the study, the researchers in Colorado examined the medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalised recreational cannabis.

Patients who smoked or ingested cannabis on a daily or weekly basis required 14 per cent more fentanyl, 20 per cent more midazolam, and 220 per cent more propofol to achieve optimum sedation for routine procedures, including colonoscopy, showed the findings published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

Also Read- Diabetes During Pregnancy Spikes up the Risk in Kids Later

“Cannabis has some metabolic effects we don’t understand and patients need to know that their cannabis use might make other medications less effective. We’re seeing some problematic trends anecdotally, and there is virtually no formal data to provide a sense of scale or suggest any evidence-based protocols,” Twardowski said.

Cannabis use in the United States increased 43 per cent between 2007 and 2015. An estimated 13.5 per cent of the adult population used cannabis during this period, with the greatest increase recorded among people 26 and older, according to the study. (IANS)