Wednesday January 22, 2020

Launch Of Maternity Scheme Brings Happiness To More Than 11 Lakh Women

Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi told the Lok Sabha, that her ministry has till now spend Rs 271.66 crore for these beneficiaries under the Maternity Scheme

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Maternity benefits under PMMVY are given to all pregnant and lactating mothers. (VOA)

More than 11 lakh women have benefited from the Maternity Scheme ‘Pradhan Mantri Matru Vandana Yojana’ (PMMVY) till date, Parliament was told on Friday.

Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi told the Lok Sabha, in a written reply, that her ministry has till now spend Rs 271.66 crore for these beneficiaries under the scheme.

“Number of beneficiaries enrolled under PMMVY has increased to 22,04,182. So far, Rs 2,048.59 crores to all the states and Union Territories have been sanctioned under PMMVY out of which Rs 2,048.40 crores have been released till date,” she added.

Pregnant Women have benefited from the maternity scheme 'Pradhan Mantri Matru Vandana Yojana' (PMMVY). Pixabay
Pregnant Women have benefited from the maternity scheme ‘Pradhan Mantri Matru Vandana Yojana’ (PMMVY). Pixabay

Under the scheme, eligible beneficiaries get Rs 5,000 and the remaining cash incentive of Rs 1,000 for maternity benefit is given under the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) after institutional delivery, it said.

Also Read: Maternity Services: Labour Induction in India is effective and Safe, says Study

Maternity benefits under PMMVY are given to all pregnant and lactating mothers. The scheme aims at providing partial compensation for wage loss in terms of cash incentives so that the woman can take adequate rest before and after delivery of the first living child. (IANS)

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Lower Physical Activity in Adulthood Leads to Obesity: Study

Adulthood linked to lower amount of physical activity

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Leaving school and getting a job both lead to a drop in the amount of physical activity. Pixabay

Leaving school and getting a job both lead to a drop in the amount of physical activity and may lead to an unhealthy lifestyle, while becoming a mother is linked to increased weight gain, researchers have found.

Many people tend to put on weight as they leave adolescence and move into adulthood and this is the age when the levels of obesity increase the fastest, the study said.

This weight gain is related to changes in diet and physical activity behaviour across the life events of early adulthood, including the move from school to further education and employment, starting new relationships and having children.

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Many people tend to put on weight as they leave adolescence and move into adulthood due to less physical activity. Pixabay

“This evidence suggests that the pressures of university, employment and childcare drive changes in behaviour which are likely to be bad for long-term health,” said study researcher Eleanor Winpenny from University of Cambridge in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Obesity Reviews, researchers looked at changes in physical activity, diet and body weight as young adults move from education into employment and to becoming a parent.

To do this, they carried out systematic reviews and meta-analyses of existing scientific literature.

In the first of the two studies, the research team looked at the evidence relating to the transition from high school into higher education or employment and how this affects body weight, diet and physical activity.

In total, they found 19 studies covering ages 15-35 years, of which 17 assessed changes in physical activity, three body weight, and five diet or eating behaviours.

The team found that leaving high school was associated with a decrease of seven minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

The decrease was larger for males than it was for females (a decrease of 16.4 minutes per day for men compared to 6.7 minutes per day for women).

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According to the researchers, most studies including physical activity showed a greater decline in parents versus non-parents. Pixabay

More detailed analysis revealed that the change is largest when people go to university, with overall levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity falling by 11.4 minutes per day.

In the second study, the team looked at the impact of becoming a parent on weight, diet and physical activity.

A meta-analysis of six studies found the difference in change in body mass index (BMI) between remaining without children and becoming a parent was 17 per cent: a woman of average height (164 cm) who had no children gained around 7.5 kg over five to six years, while a mother of the same height would gain an additional 1.3 kg.

Also Read- Gene Expression Signature in Blood May Predict Onset of Tuberculosis

These equate to increases in BMI of 2.8 versus 3.3. According to the researchers, most studies including physical activity showed a greater decline in parents versus non-parents.

The research team found limited evidence for diet, which did not seem to differ between parents and non-parents. (IANS)