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MCD employees protest continues for 11th day

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New Delhi: MCD employees protest continues for the 11th day over the non-payment of salaries. The strike by municipal workers continued until Saturday as employees of Delhi’s civic bodies burnt effigies of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal.

Hundreds of employees of the municipal corporations staged a noisy demonstration and dumped garbage at various places including the camp office of Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia in Khirchipur and Shyam Lal College in Burari.

The protestors staged a march and also burnt an effigy of Transport Minister Gopal Rai near his office at Babarput in east Delhi.

“We will continue to dump garbage on the streets of Delhi till our demands are met,” Sanjay Gehlot, president of the Mazdoor Vikas Sanyukta Morcha, told agency.

Gahlot said workers will visit Delhi High Court on Monday and apprise it of the whole issue.

United Front of MCD Employees president Rajesh Mishra said a section of doctors and engineers called off their strike but it will not affect their ongoing protest. “The strike is on,” he maintained.

“We will not call off our strike till our demands of reaching a permanent solution to the crisis and merger of municipal corporations are considered,” he added.

Employees of Delhi’s civic bodies have been protesting over the non-payment of salaries for the past few months and directing their ire at both the Delhi and central governments for the last 11 days.

Lt Governor Najeeb Jung on Friday announced a loan of Rs.300 crore to two municipal corporations for payment of salaries to striking workers, but they refused to heed to his appeal to return to work.

Earlier this week, the Kejriwal government had also announced Rs.551 crore to the North and East Delhi Municipal Corporations for paying salaries.(IANS)

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Mothers Find Gaps in Accessibility of Breastfeeding Resources at Work: Research

Mothers still face barriers to breastfeed at work

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The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers. Pixabay

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, says a new health research.

The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers.

“We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation,” said study lead author Rachel McCardel from University of Georgia in US.

“There is a collective experience that we wanted to explore and learn how can we make this better,” McCardel added.

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Returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation. Pixabay

For the findings, research team specifically wanted to better understand breastfeed support in the workplace since US federal guidelines went into place over a decade ago requiring employers to provide unpaid break time and a space other than a restroom for employees to be able to express breast milk.

For their study, the research team surveyed female employees who performed a variety of jobs.

In addition to asking questions about their access to breast feed resources like private rooms, breast pumps and lactation consultants, the respondents were also asked about their experiences with combining breastfeeding and work.

They found that most respondents, nearly 80 per cent, had a private space at work to express milk, and around two-thirds of the women reported having break times to breastfeed.

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Access to other resources like lactation consultants or breast pumps was less common.

According to the study, many respondents also said they hadn’t expected to get much help from their employers, and there was a general lack of communication about the resources available to them. (IANS)