Thursday November 15, 2018

Meal Rich in Calories Increases Risk of Diabetes

The results will be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago

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The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
High calorie meal for dinner may up heart disease, diabetes risk. Pixabay
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Eating a meal rich in calories for dinner can increase the risk of diabetes as well as lead to poorer cardiovascular health, researchers have warned.

The findings showed that eating the majority of a person’s daily calories in the evening, post 6 p.m. may lead to an increased risk of developing pre-diabetes and high blood pressure, which can lead to diabetes and affect the heart.

Every one per cent increase in the number of calories eaten after 6 p.m. — about 20 calories in a 2,000-calorie daily diet — was associated with higher fasting glucose, insulin and insulin resistance, all of which are associated with an increased risk of diabetes.

Eating 30 per cent or more of a day’s calories after 6 p.m. was associated with a 23 per cent higher risk of developing high blood pressure and a 19 per cent higher risk of becoming pre-diabetic.

“There is increasing evidence that when we eat is important, in addition to what we eat and how much we eat,” said lead author Nour Makarem, a postdoctoral student at the Columbia University in New York.

“In our study we show that if you eat most of your calories before 6 p.m., you may have better cardiovascular health.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Your meal timing matters and eating earlier in the day may be an important strategy to help lower the risk for heart disease,” Makarem said.

However, night-time eating was not associated with being overweight and obese or having central adiposity (fat).

For the study, the team analysed the meal timing of 12,708 participants, aged 18 to 76, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

Also Read- Exposure to Lead, Mercury Increases Cholesterol Levels

More than half of the study participants (56.6 per cent) reported consuming more than 30 per cent of their food intake after 6 p.m.

The results will be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago. (IANS)

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Poor Aerobic Fitness Increases Risk of Diabetes in Kids

Their aerobic fitness was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake during a maximal exercise test

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Diabetes
Poor aerobic fitness can up diabetes, heart disease risk in kids. Pixabay

Lack of exercise, particularly poor aerobic fitness, in children increases their risk for developing Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, says a new study.

Children with poor aerobic fitness in proportion to their total body mass were found to have a significantly higher risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than their peers having better aerobic fitness.

“Measures of aerobic fitness that are based on total body mass are better at predicting the risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than measures that are based on skeletal muscle mass,” said Andrew Agbaje, lead researcher from the University of Eastern Finland.

“However, they exaggerate the role of aerobic fitness in children’s health,” he added.

For the study, researchers determined threshold values of aerobic fitness for 352 children, aged between 9 and 11 who are at an increased risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Their aerobic fitness was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake during a maximal exercise test.

The team also calculated variables indicative of the risk of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, such as waist circumference, blood levels of insulin, glucose, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides as well as blood pressure.

Also Read- Your Genes May Not Help You Live Long

The study, published in the journal Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, found that the traditional way of expressing aerobic fitness in proportion to total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic fitness in identifying children at an increased risk of these diseases.

“We should be cautious when interpreting aerobic fitness measures that are proportioned to total body mass in order to correctly identify children who truly need health and lifestyle intervention,” Agbaje noted. (IANS)