Friday December 13, 2019

Study: Meat Based Diet can Improve Infant Growth

Meat-based diet improves length growth in infants

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Study: Meat Based Diet can Improve Infant Growth.
63% Indians want to replace meat with plant-based food: Report. Pixabay

Giving formula-fed infants a higher protein diet such as pureed meat can improve their early length growth, new research suggests.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggest that meat, such as pork, can be an important source of much-needed protein in an infant’s diet during the transition to solid foods.

“Meat, such as pork, provides important micronutrients, is an excellent source of protein and can be an important complementary food for infants who are ready for solid foods,” said lead study author Minghua Tang, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at University of Colorado Denver-Anschutz, in the US.

“Our research suggests introducing higher amounts of protein and introducing meat, such as pork, into the diet at five months could be potentially beneficial for linear growth (length gain),” Tang said.

Also Read: Eat Less Saturated, Trans Fats to Curb Heart Disease: WHO

In the study, a small group of healthy, formula-fed infants ate meat-based complementary foods, such as pureed ham and beef, or dairy-based complementary foods from ages five to 12 months old, increasing their protein intake from two grams of protein per kg each day before the study up to three grams per kg each day during the study period.

While the protein increased, both calories and fat intakes stayed the same between the meat and dairy groups, regardless of protein source.

The researchers found the pureed meats promoted a greater rate of growth — with length of nearly one inch greater compared to the dairy-fed group at 12 months of age, with no increase in risk of being overweight at the completion of the seven-month study. (IANS)

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This Healthy Mediterranean Diet Includes Meat to Cater to Western Tastes

New Mediterranean diet lets you eat meat without any guilt

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Meat Diet
Eat meat without any guilt by following this new mediterranean diet. Lifetime Stock

Researchers have developed a new version of Mediterranean diet that includes meat to cater to Western tastes and also deliver health benefits.

A typical Mediterranean diet includes extra virgin olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, wholegrain breads, pastas and cereals, moderate amount of fish and red wine, and low consumption of red meat, sweet and processed foods.

The new version of the Mediterranean diet includes 2-3 serves (250g) of fresh lean pork each week.

The findings published in the journal Nutrients showed that the Mediterranean-Pork (Med-Pork) diet delivers cognitive benefits.

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The new version of the Mediterranean diet includes 2-3 serves (250g) of meat each week. Lifetime Stock

“The Mediterranean diet is widely accepted as the healthiest diet and is renowned for delivering improved cardiovascular and cognitive health, but in Western cultures, the red meat restrictions of the diet could make it hard for people to stick to,” said Alexandra Wade from University of South Australia.

“By adding pork to the Mediterranean diet, we’re broadening the appeal of the diet, while also delivering improved cognitive function,” Wade said.

This study compared the cognitive effects of people aged 45-80 years and at risk of cardiovascular disease following a Med-Pork or a low-fat diet (often prescribed to negate risk factors for cardiovascular disease).

The results showed the Med-Pork intervention outperformed the low-fat diet, delivering higher cognitive processing speeds and emotional functioning, both markers of good mental health.

Also Read- Nipah Virus has Serious Epidemic Potential: Health Experts

“Improving people’s processing speed shows the brain is working well,” Wade said.

“Then, when you add the fact that pork production emits only a fraction of the greenhouse gases compared with beef, and the Med-Pork diet is really ticking all boxes — taste, health and environment,” Wade said. (IANS)