Thursday October 24, 2019

Study: Meat Based Diet can Improve Infant Growth

Meat-based diet improves length growth in infants

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Study: Meat Based Diet can Improve Infant Growth.
63% Indians want to replace meat with plant-based food: Report. Pixabay

Giving formula-fed infants a higher protein diet such as pureed meat can improve their early length growth, new research suggests.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggest that meat, such as pork, can be an important source of much-needed protein in an infant’s diet during the transition to solid foods.

“Meat, such as pork, provides important micronutrients, is an excellent source of protein and can be an important complementary food for infants who are ready for solid foods,” said lead study author Minghua Tang, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at University of Colorado Denver-Anschutz, in the US.

“Our research suggests introducing higher amounts of protein and introducing meat, such as pork, into the diet at five months could be potentially beneficial for linear growth (length gain),” Tang said.

Also Read: Eat Less Saturated, Trans Fats to Curb Heart Disease: WHO

In the study, a small group of healthy, formula-fed infants ate meat-based complementary foods, such as pureed ham and beef, or dairy-based complementary foods from ages five to 12 months old, increasing their protein intake from two grams of protein per kg each day before the study up to three grams per kg each day during the study period.

While the protein increased, both calories and fat intakes stayed the same between the meat and dairy groups, regardless of protein source.

The researchers found the pureed meats promoted a greater rate of growth — with length of nearly one inch greater compared to the dairy-fed group at 12 months of age, with no increase in risk of being overweight at the completion of the seven-month study. (IANS)

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Study: Infants can Learn to Associate Ethnicity with Language

The research was done in Vancouver, Canada where approximately nine per cent of the population can speak Cantonese

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ethnicity, languages, infants
This study suggests young infants pick up on specific language-ethnicity pairings based on the faces and languages they encounter, researchers said. Pixabay

A study has found that babies as young as 11-month-olds can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity. Published in the journal Developmental Psychobiology, the research found that infants looked at faces of Asian descendents rather than at those who looked Caucasian when hearing the Cantonese language versus English.

“Our findings suggest that by 11 months, infants start making connections between languages and ethnicities based on the individuals they encounter in their environments,” said Lillian May, Professor at the University of British Columbia in Canada.

“In learning about language, infants are doing more than picking up sounds and sentences, they also learn about the speakers of language,” she added. The research was done in Vancouver, Canada where approximately nine per cent of the population can speak Cantonese.

infants, language, ethnicity
“In learning about language, infants are doing more than picking up sounds and sentences, they also learn about the speakers of language,” she added. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers played English-learning infants of Caucasian ancestry sentences in both English and Cantonese and showed them pictures of people of Caucasian descent and of Asian descent.

ALSO READ: Study: Students who Take Music Courses Tend to Score Better in Exams than Non-Musical Peers

When the infants heard Cantonese, they looked more at the Asian faces than when they were hearing English. When they heard English, they looked equally to Asian and Caucasian faces.

This study suggests young infants pick up on specific language-ethnicity pairings based on the faces and languages they encounter, researchers said. “The link between speaker characteristics and language is something no one has to teach babies. They learn it all on their own,” said Janet Werker, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)