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Majority of Meat-Eaters Believe Veganism is Ethical for Environment

The study, published in the journal Sustainability, looked at public opinion on plant-based diets

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Veganism
Many people agree with the principles of veganism is one thing, but in terms of changing behaviours we need to acknowledge that for many it has been seen as too expensive, inconvenient and a sacrifice in terms of taste. Pixabay

Most meat eaters admit veganism is ethical and good for the environment, researchers have found.

The study, published in the journal Sustainability, looked at public opinion on plant-based diets and found widespread support for the ethics and environmental benefits of veganism and vegetarianism among meat-eaters.

The findings from University of Bath, UK, suggest that 73 per cent of meat-eaters surveyed, considered veganism to be ‘ethical’, 70 per cent said it was good for the environment and half (50 per cent) considered it healthy and 60 per cent thought veganism was ‘acceptable’.

“At a time of year when many people are considering switching to plant-based diets with ‘Veganuary’, this study shows that most people already agree with the ethics of veganism and are aware of the benefits of vegan diets to the environment,” said study researcher Chris Bryant from the University of Bath.

The study, which involved 1,000 men and women with an average age of 34, was conducted in September 2018. Participants were recruited online through the survey platform Prolific. By contrast, over 80 per cent of respondents thought veganism was not easy, 77 per cent thought it ‘inconvenient’ and over 60 per cent thought it was not enjoyable.

Attitudes from respondents towards vegetarianism were significantly more positive on almost all counts. According to the researchers, this research is focused on shifting preferences away from animal consumption in view of climate change and reducing animal suffering.

“Many people agree with the principles of veganism is one thing, but in terms of changing behaviours we need to acknowledge that for many it has been seen as too expensive, inconvenient and a sacrifice in terms of taste,” Bryant said.

Veganism
Most meat eaters admit veganism is ethical and good for the environment, researchers have found. Pixabay

Interestingly, in the time since this study was conducted, these things have all changed substantially. Supermarkets, restaurants, and even fast food outlets have developed numerous high quality and affordable vegan options, the study said. “Having direct replacements for the foods people know and like makes it easier for everybody to consume fewer animal products,” Bryant said.

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“If we are to reduce animal product consumption in the UK and around the world, the development of high quality affordable alternatives to animal products is key,” Bryant added. (IANS)

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36% Consumers Would Like Devices to Offer Guidance on Environment: Report

36% consumers want guidance on environment from devices

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36% consumers would prefer being guided on environment by devices. Pixabay

While nearly half of consumers worldwide see technological innovation as critical to tackling future environmental challenges, about 36 per cent would like their devices to offer guidance on leading a more environmentally conscious life, an Ericsson report said on Wednesday.

Interestingly, consumers who think technology will be crucial in solving future environmental challenges express almost twice the interest in various ICT solutions to help them live more environmentally consciously, compared to others, said the report “Consumers, sustainability and ICT”.

“ICT tools and services can play a significant part in assisting consumer’s daily efforts to reduce their personal environmental impact,” Zeynep Ahmet Vidal, Senior Researcher at Ericsson Consumer & IndustryLab and author of the report, said in a statement.

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Consumers who think technology will be crucial in solving future environmental challenges express almost twice the interest in various ICT solutions. Pixabay

The consumers do perceive ICT as helpful as an aid in their daily life, be it for environmental, health, cost or convenience-related reasons.

“But ICT also has the potential to enable future innovation in climate action, and here the service providers have a unique opportunity and position to provide novel solutions that can aid consumers in making more sustainable choices in daily life,” Vidal said.

The findings of Ericsson’s latest ConsumerLab report is based on a quantitative study of 12,000 Internet users from across the world.

The countries involved in the study include India, the US, Brazil, the UK, Germany, Spain, Russia, South Africa, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, China and Australia. The sample consists of 1,000 respondents from each country.

The report uncovers the current consumer mindset of leading environmentally sustainable lifestyles.

In the last two decades alone, concern about air and water pollution has risen from concerning one in five consumers, to almost one in two, the research showed.

While consideration for climate change and global warming has also risen from 13 per cent of consumers to 50 per cent.

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Global warming has also risen from 13 per cent of consumers to 50 per cent. Pixabay

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The study also includes consumers’ thoughts on where ultimate responsibility lies in mitigating environmental impact.

Globally, 8 in 10 consumers consider governments as being responsible for environmental protection.

While approximately 70 per cent consider that citizens should also be responsible, 5 in 10 expect companies and brands to uphold their share of the responsibility, said the report. (IANS)

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Coronavirus Pandemic: A Punishment for Humans?

Humans have caused irreparable damage to earth over the span of millions of year

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The world has seen many pandemics in the past before Coronavirus pandemic. Pixabay

By Muskan Bhatnagar

It’s been over 6 months since the Coronavirus outbreak and the world is still fighting against it. Coronavirus Worldometer suggests a total of 4,907,135 cases so far, including cases that resulted in deaths and the ones recovered. This is not the first time that the world is going through a pandemic and crisis. Humans saw the Spanish Flu back in 1918, the spread of HIV in 1981, and the most recent one in 2009, H1N1 Swine flu. These pandemics killed millions of people across the globe, just like COVID-19

Since the onset of the year 2020, the world has faced terrible situations. The year began with Australia still on wildfires, a US drone strike on Iran which could’ve escalated to another World War in January, February saw a global stock market crash, in March COVID-19 had spread globally forcing nations to shut down, the global death toll from COVID-19 exceeds 200,000 in April and the world economy is expected to shrink  3%, which is the worst contraction since the 1930s Great Depression. With the onset of May, the global death toll exceeds 300,000 and the world faces a global mental health crisis because of isolation, fear, and economic crisis.

It’s not even been 6 months into this year and the world has already the worst of times. But the question is- who is responsible for all this? The answer is crystal clear. It is us, the human race.

The modern form of humans has existed on earth from 200,000 years. With time, humans have conquered the planet, excelled in the fields of science and technology, made impossible things possible, and developed a world with possibly the most luxurious facilities.

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Humans have caused a lot of damage to the planet with activities like deforestation. Pixabay

In the process of development, humans have caused irreparable damage to Earth and the environment which includes ecosystems, biodiversity, natural resources, etc.

Overconsumption and over-exploitation of resources, overpopulation of humans, global warming, pollution, deforestation, etc have caused damages that are irreversible now. We have exploited the planet to an extent where it’s impossible to rectify the damage we have caused.

Speaking about my personal opinion, this year seems to be a punishment to the human species for all the harm we have caused to nature and the environment since the day of our existence. We have hurt the nature, animals, birds, plants, and even our fellow human beings, and this devastating situation right now, feels like we’re repaying for it.

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People have been hunting animals and destroying ecosystems since a long time. Pixabay

We have killed a countless number of animals and birds just to satisfy our hunger even when we can live without eating them, we have killed animals for the sake of wearing good clothes, we have killed animals just to pursue our hobby of hunting, we have cut down trees so that we can make paper and write ‘save trees’ on them, we have caused air pollution so that we don’t sweat, we have exploited natural resources like petroleum just for the sake of our laziness, we have destroyed forests for the purpose of making luxurious cities, we have damaged the water bodies because we can’t even throw garbage in a bin.

And we happen to be the ‘best creation of God’ and also the smartest species to ever exist on this planet.

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The earth seems to be healing itself while we are confined to our homes. Pixabay

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Is the development and smartness of any use if the planet is no more able to sustain us? It feels like nature took everything in its hands and decided to punish us from all possible aspects and started to heal itself by confining us to our houses.

Nature has bounced back as we are locked inside our homes. The world has seen a significant positive change in the environment with many countries experiencing a fall in carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide of as much as 40%. With the minimum use of cars on the road, it seems to be a piece of potential good news for the climate as oil happens to be the biggest source of carbon emissions. Not just this, but the flora and fauna have also received a big positive change.

The World and its people are suffering and facing the worst of times, but the planet earth seems to be relieved.

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“The Zoo: COVID-19 and Animals”: A Documentary

The documentary shows the effects of the Coronavirus pandemic on animals

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Bronx Zoo announced that their four-year-old Malayan tiger Nadia had tested positive for coronavirus. Pixabay

A new documentary, “The Zoo: COVID-19 and Animals”, shows the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on animals.

When the Bronx Zoo announced their four-year-old Malayan tiger Nadia had tested positive for the dreaded virus, the world was shocked to learn that animals can be victims of this pandemic too. Many questions were raised.

Dave Salmoni, a big cat expert, has dived deep to answer these questions in the special documentary.

Salmoni spoke with a wide spectrum of experts, from the World Health Organization to wildlife biologists to veterinarians, to uncover how the virus affects animals and how pet owners can keep their pets and family safe.

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“The Zoo: COVID-19 And Animals” will premiere on May 17 on Animal Planet, Animal Planet HD and Discovery Plus app. Wikimedia Commons

“When news about Nadia the tiger came out, the questions immediately began: What about my pets? How do I keep my animals and family safe? We’re going to answer these questions and more through this documentary. We’re speaking to a wide range of experts from the World Health Organization, to wildlife biologists, to veterinarians,” said Salmoni.

Read More: 2020 Sees a Steep Drop Of 8% in Global IT Spending Due to COVID-19: Gartner

“We are at war with this disease and so we get down to the nitty gritty, and discuss practical questions about daily lives with our pets. We know animals do play a role in this pandemic, and when it comes to our pets, we have to take care of them like any other member of our family,” he added.

“The Zoo: COVID-19 And Animals” will premiere on May 17 on Animal Planet, Animal Planet HD and Discovery Plus app.

“We have been the forefront of busting myths around novel coronavirus with international documentaries. With this latest film, we take a hard look at how animals are being treated during such a crisis and the safety measures that can be taken to keep both, the people and their pets healthy,” said Sai Abishek, Director–Content, Factual & Lifestyle Entertainment – South Asia, Discovery. (IANS)