Monday March 30, 2020

This Latest Mechanism May Treat Cardiovascular Diseases

According to the researchers, such a mechanism has been proposed for 25 years, but has never previously been shown

0
//
Heart Disease
The researcher Martin Fronius at University of Otago in New Zealand, identified a new mechanism that contributes to "flow-mediated dilation", which is the dilation of an artery when blood flow increases in that artery. Pixabay

Researchers have identified a new mechanism for the regulation of blood pressure, which paves the way for advances in treating cardiovascular disease (CVD).

According to the study, the researcher Martin Fronius at University of Otago in New Zealand, identified a new mechanism that contributes to “flow-mediated dilation”, which is the dilation of an artery when blood flow increases in that artery.

“Our research identified a new mechanism that contributes to flow-mediated dilation, revealing how force sensation occurs at the molecular level in cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical cues is important for touch and pain sensation, related to hearing but also important for blood pressure regulation,” Fronius said.

“Our understanding of how cells in our body sense mechanical cues related to blood flow and pressure is scarce,” Fronius added.

For the findings, published in the journal PNAS, study researcher Fronius collaborated with colleagues from the University of Otago together with researchers from Germany and Spain.

By studying a mechanosensitive ion channel, the researchers identified that force sensation involved a physical connection of the channel to parts outside of the cells, such as connective tissue, via molecules that act as tethers.

ECG
Researchers have identified a new mechanism for the regulation of blood pressure, which paves the way for advances in treating cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pixabay

The study revealed that this tether-based mechanism is involved in blood pressure regulation.

According to the researchers, such a mechanism has been proposed for 25 years, but has never previously been shown.

ALSO READ: Tech Giant Samsung Plans To Increase Production of Foldabe Displays to 1 Million Units

“This provides new targets (new venues) for drug discovery to improve treatment of cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure,” Fronius said. (IANS)

Next Story

Here Are Some Health-Boosting Beverages Which You Can Try

Want to have a quick, refreshing drink that also boosts your health and immunity? Look no further

0
Beverages
Beverages can make you feel refreshed and energized. Pixabay

Want to have a quick, refreshing drink that also boosts your health and immunity? Look no further, these recipes don’t come out of a bottle and are healthier options suggests Chef Ayesha Nallaseth, Culinary Product Specialist, Tupperware India.

Banana Walnut Shake

Ingredients:

Half tropical cup banana,
peeled and quartered
1 cup milk
2 tbsp walnuts
chopped
4-5 ice cubes
Honey to drizzle

Method: Chop the banana and walnut. Add the mixture to Tupperware Quick Shake, pour milk, honey and ice cubes and shake well till well incorporated and serve immediately.

Tip: Complete food for the nerves, muscle, immunity and brain to save them from damage and boost recovery.

Ultimate Green Smoothie

Ingredients:

1 cup soy milk/almond milk
1 cup spinach leaves
1 banana
1 tbsp peanut butter

Breakfast Drink, Almond, Cocoa, Nibs, Shake, Banana
Healthy beverages may actually boost your immunity and help you stay fit in long run. Pixabay

Method: Add the spinach leaves banana and peanut butter and finely chop. Add ice cubes to quick shake add the above mix and soy or almond milk and shake well. Serve chilled.

Kahwa tea

Ingredients:

2 cups water
1 Tsp tea leaves
2 tsp sugar
4 green cardamom
1 pc Cinnamon stick,
4 to 5 strands saffron (optional)

ALSO READ: Researchers Develop New Framework To Select Best Trees For Fighting Air Pollution

Method: Boil water add the tea leaves and sugar and strain and pour it in the flask. Then add the cardamom, cinnamon sticks and saffron strands.

Close the flask. Serve using smidgets as a welcome drink. (IANS)