Thursday February 21, 2019

Media reporting of medical doctors are not gospel TRUTHS

0
//

By Dr. J.K. Bhutani

It was there earlier too but became prominent and absurdly clichéd with the broadcast of Aamir Khan’s show Satyamev Jayate in 2012. The rot of some unethical doctors was generalised and made a gospel truth for the ‘not-so-informed’ illiterate and naive millions in India. It has been a falling grace ever since. Every day the news channels and print media, especially vernacular press is full of filth and bias directed towards the medical profession and the hospitals. All Government sector setups, private hospital and small clinics are projected and shown as butcher shops and all the doctors manning these are devils and Draculas.

Doctors stethoscope

The disgrace and distrust are unending it seems. so much so that 78 per cent of doctor parents recently asked about the choice of the career for their kids RESOLVED not to make their wards doctors in future. The ‘Why I will never allow my child to become a doctor in India’ blog, which became a cult and fashion read of the high, mighty and the middle class is becoming an educative pamphlet for the medical personnel before selecting the careers of their children.

Is it really so bad and is the end of the tunnel dead and abyss?

In India we have just 2 percent of the annual budget for public health, and with an average ratio of one doctor for every 1700 patients, the public health system is overburdened and overstretched. The practice of amazing skill, compassion and the state-of-the-art medical care, 24×7 everyday all through the year is not an easy task and when the whole world recognises the prowess and the gifted skills of Indian doctors and India is on the verge of Medical Tourism hub of the world, WHY our media finds only flaws, faults and sins in our doctors.

The life of a doctor is not all hard work, labour and bad press, it is much more. Each day can be a realisation and revelation of God and of the humbling healing powers of faith, love and compassion. The pride of being a doctor is precious. The suffering, if any, is by choice and the material benefits are incidental. A good doctor is the BEST a human being can be.

Instead of drawing unfair generalizations, let us join and resolve to press for the followings from the government, media and the public.

  1. All medical reporting in print, broadcast, television and social media be done by qualified journalists who know the nuances and ever-evolving medical science’s miracles and the yet imperfect scenarios and limits. All journalists reporting with a bias or yellow journalism motives should be appropriately reprimanded or punished.
  2. All the cases of medical negligence put up in the Consumer or the civil courts should be decided after having the expert opinion of the subject specialist from the teaching medical colleges or the best would be if some judges are trained in the medical sciences too.
  3. All state and the central governments should try to inculcate and encourage the scientific temper in the school curricula and the government media services. There should be a couple of broadcast Television channels or a web resource for spreading the scientific rational of the diseases and the benefits and the limitation of the science. Above all, the governments need to strengthen the public health care services to reach the maximum populace and integrate the private sector with more insurance inclusions.

JK1

Dr J.K. Bhutani MD is a protagonist of preventive and promotive health care based on austere biology and facilitating self healing powers of human organism.
You can follow him at  https://twitter.com/drjkbhutani

Next Story

HPV Vaccination May Bring An End To Cervical Cancer In India by 2070

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

0
cancer
Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations. Pixabay

Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening and vaccination must be taken up on a war footing in countries like India to prevent 15 million cervical cancer deaths among women by 2050, a Lancet research said.

Causing the second-highest number of deaths among Indian women among cancer variants, cervical cancer, in a majority of cases, is caused by HPV, a group of more than 150 viruses.

The efforts might even result in cervical cancer being eliminated as a public health hazard in India by 2070-79, according to the study, published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

Cancer
“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS. Pixabay

If the high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening cannot be achieved globally, over 44 million women could be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the next 50 years with two-thirds of these cases and an additional estimated 15 million deaths, would occur in countries with low and medium levels of development.

“More than two thirds of cases prevented would be in countries with low and medium levels of human development like India, Nigeria, and Malawi, where there has so far been limited access to HPV vaccination or cervical screening,” said lead author Professor Karen Canfell from the Cancer Council New South Wales in Australia.

However, large disparities exist in cervical screening and HPV vaccination coverage among countries.

“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS.

“While societal barriers prevent women from seeking medical help in advance, women are forced to come out at a later stage when the disease has reached an advanced stage,” she said.

cancer
Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said. Pixabay

However, Canfell says that despite the enormity of the problem, their findings suggest that “global elimination is within reach with tools that are already available, provided that both high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening can be achieved.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations.

Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said.

Also Read: Indian IT Act Silent On Social Media’s Manipulative Role
“Diagnostic tests such as the pap smear are effective in identifying cancerous tendencies.

“However, these tests are available with a limited number of providers and largely within the cities. This makes screening sporadic and leaves out women who live in rural areas,” Aneja added. (IANS)