Friday January 24, 2020

Consuming Mediterranean Diet Prevents Risk of Age-related Blindness

The entire pattern of eating a nutrient-rich diet, instead of individual food varieties such as fish, fruits and vegetables, helps significantly curb the risk of late AMD, the researchers noted

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Mediterranean Food
Mediterranean Food. (Representational Image). Wikimedia Commons

Consuming a Mediterranean diet rich in fruits, vegetables, grains, potatoes, olive oil, seeds, fish, low saturated fat, dairy products and red meat can help prevent potential blindness in later stages of life, a study has found.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative eye disease and a leading cause of vision loss among people age 50 and older.

It causes loss of central vision, which is crucial for simple everyday activities, such as the ability to see faces, drive, read, and write.

In analysing the connection between genes and lifestyle on the development of AMD, researchers from the European Union found that people who adhered to a Mediterranean diet cut their risk of late-stage AMD by 41 per cent.

The findings, published in the journal Ophthalmology, expands on previous studies and suggests that such a diet is beneficial for everyone, whether you already have the disease or are at risk of developing it.

Mediterranean Diet
Mediterranean Diet. Pixabay

“I believe this is a public health issue on the same scale as smoking. Chronic diseases such as AMD, dementia, obesity, and diabetes, all have roots in poor dietary habits. It’s time to take quitting a poor diet as seriously as quitting smoking,” said Emily Chew, a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Previous research has linked Mediterranean diet to a longer lifespan and a reduced incidence of heart disease and cognitive decline.

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For the new study, the team analysed food-frequency questionnaires from nearly 5,000 people who participated in two investigations focused separately on disease risks in people aged 55 and older and the links between eye diseases and nutritional factors in people aged 73 and older.

The entire pattern of eating a nutrient-rich diet, instead of individual food varieties such as fish, fruits and vegetables, helps significantly curb the risk of late AMD, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Adopting Mediterranean Diet may Help Kidney Patients Post Transplant

According to the findings, each 2-point higher score was associated with a 29 per cent lower risk of kidney function decline and a 32 per cent lower risk of kidney failure

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Mediterranean Food
Mediterranean Food. (Representational Image). Wikimedia Commons

Adopting a Mediterranean diet could help preserve kidney functions in patients who have had transplants, suggests a new study.

According to the study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, kidney transplant recipients, those with higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet were less likely to experience kidney function loss.

A typical Mediterranean diet includes extra virgin olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, wholegrain breads, pastas and cereals, moderate amount of fish and red wine, and low consumption of red meat, sweet and processed foods.

“Increasing scientific evidence has demonstrated health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet on cardiovascular and kidney health.” said the study’s researcher Antonio Gomes-Neto from University of Groningen, Netherlands.

“In this study, we show that kidney transplant recipients with higher adherence to the Mediterranean Diet are less likely to experience function loss of their kidney transplant,” Gomes-Neto said.

According to the researchers, despite improvements in the survival of transplanted kidneys in the early years after transplantation, loss of kidney function within 10 years still occurs in more than one-third of recipients.

meat
The new version of the Mediterranean diet includes 2-3 serves (250g) of meat each week. Lifetime Stock

For the findings, the research team investigated whether adhering to the Mediterranean diet might help protect transplant recipients’ kidney health.

For the study, 632 adult kidney transplant recipients with a functioning donor kidney for at least one year completed a food-related questionnaire, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using a 9-point score.

During an average follow-up of 5.2 years, 119 recipients experienced kidney function decline (76 of whom developed kidney failure), the research said.

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The Mediterranean Diet score was inversely associated with kidney function decline and kidney failure.

According to the findings, each 2-point higher score was associated with a 29 per cent lower risk of kidney function decline and a 32 per cent lower risk of kidney failure. (IANS)