Monday November 12, 2018
Home India Meet Raj Moha...

Meet Raj Mohan Nair: The Electric Man of India

Raj Mohan got to know about his super-power when he was 7 years old

1
//
Raj Mohan Nair Image Source: www.peoples.pw
Republish
Reprint
  • Raj Mohan can withstand several amps of electricity passing through his body without any bodily harm
  • Although his eyes get glazed over when the current passes through his body, rendering him temporarily blind
  • Raj’s body is over 10 times more resistant than that of an average human

Truth is stranger than fiction Indeed! Do you know what happens if you pass a tenth of an amp through a human’s body? He/she will die without any question, due to electrocution. Surprisingly, this is not true for the Electric Man of India- Raj Mohan Nair.

This man can do extraordinary things as his body is immune to high voltage electricity. He can withstand several amps of electricity passing through his body without any bodily harm. This Human conductor wraps exposed wires around his body, and electricity flows from main plug, through his body, to electric bulbs, iron plates etc, said the incredibleweird.com report.

Follow NewsGram at Twitter: @newsgram1

A man electrocuted at a construction site. Image source: www.snitchngr.com
A man electrocuted at a construction site. Image source: www.snitchngr.com

While a fraction of one ampere is enough to kill an ordinary human being, this man can conduct several amps through his body without any harm caused. With one wire in his mouth for better conductivity and the other anywhere else on his body, Mohan lets the electrical current run through him and into whatever other device he’s trying to power on.

He got to know about his super-power when he was just 7 years old. He said, “I lost my mother and was depressed. Finally, I decided to end my life by climbing the transformer and grabbing a live wire. To my amazement, nothing happened to me. It was then I realized that I had been blessed with a gift from God.”

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram.com

The incredibleweird.com report said, there is nothing special about his looks but witnessing him while preparing chicken by grabbing a hot plate in his own hands will surely leave you in complete shock. If this much amount of current passes through a normal person for just a fraction of second then it causes permanent muscle damage and may stop one’s heartbeat.

Although, his eyes get glazed over when the current passes through his body, rendering him temporarily blind. After testing Raj Mohan Nair’s resistance to electricity using a multimeter, Daniel Browning Smith found that Raj’s body is over 10 times more resistant than that of an average human. He has capabilities, which no ordinary human possesses.

-This article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Oh my god! This is so strange!

Next Story

Body Heat Can Be the Source of Power for Wearable Devices

The aim is to create a product that can be mass produced

0
Heat
Body Heat Converted Into Electricity Powers Health Sensors. (VOA)

There has been an increasing number of wearable heat technologies that have health sensors as medical tools to track a person’s well-being. Many of these devices need to be charged or are battery-powered.

A handful of researchers want to take batteries out of the equation and instead, use waste body heat and convert that into useful electricity to power sensors.

“The average person is something like an 80-watt light bulb,” said Jamie Grunlan, Texas A&M University’s Linda & Ralph Schmidt ’68 Professor in Mechanical Engineering.

Grunlan and his team of researchers are working on using the waste heat the body gives off and converting that into useful electricity. The idea is to create printable, paintable thermoelectric technology that looks like ink and can coat a wearable fabric, similar to dyeing colors onto cloth. Once a person wears the fabric, devices such as health sensors can be powered.

“Our coating coats every fiber within that textile, and so what’s drawing it is simply that textile needs to just be touching the heat source or be close enough to the heat source to be feeling the heat source,” Grunlan said.

Military and sporting goods companies have applications for this type of technology because there is not a large battery pack worn on the body that could be a cause of injury if the person would fall.

“They would love to power health sensors off of body heat and then wirelessly transmit that data to wherever,” Grunlan explained. “You’d like to know if somebody had a concussion or was dehydrated or something like that while it’s happening in real time.”

As a person generates heat, the temperature outside is colder than what’s against the body. The temperature differential generates a voltage.

The goal is to design technology that can get one volt or up to 10 percent efficiency and beyond. So, for example, a researcher would try to get eight watts from a person who is generating 80 watts.

The ingredients in this thermoelectric recipe include carbon nanotubes, polymers and a carbon material called graphene, which is a nanoparticle.

Researchers are trying to perfect the recipe of this ink-like material.

“The one voltage is realistic, but how much material do we need to get that one voltage because we need as little as possible?” said Carolyn Long, a Ph.D. graduate student at Texas A&M.

Also Read about- Google Takes Initiative To Clean And Make Our Planet Healthy

“So, different polymers, different amounts of the multi-walled or double-walled nanotubes, adding the graphene, which order it needs to go in exactly to create the best pathway for the electrons for the thermoelectric material,” said Long of the various experiments she and her lab mates have conducted.

The aim is to create a product that can be mass produced.

“It will happen. It’s not will it happen. It’s when. Is it a year, or is it five years?” Grunlan said.

That will depend on how much funding and manpower is available to make this technology a reality. (VOA)