Saturday November 18, 2017

Melatonin May Help Treat Blood Cancers like Leukemia and Lymphoma, Claims a New Research

The researchers have noted that the anti-cancer actions of melatonin will be helpful in facilitating clinical applications and basic research

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Melatonin produced by a gland in the brain can help treat blood cancers
Melatonin may help treat blood cancers. Pixabay
  • Researchers have discovered that Melatonin may help treat blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma 
  • Melatonin’s involvement in regulation of circadian rhythms may help in coordination and synchronization of internal body functions 
  • Anti-cancer actions of melatonin are expected to be helpful in facilitating basic research 

Washington D.C. [USA], September 3, 2017: Researchers have discovered that blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma may be treated with a hormone produced by a small gland in the brain.

Melatonin, a hormone produced by a small gland in the brain may be able to treat blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, according to the researchers.

The findings suggest that melatonin performs a number of tasks such as boosting the immune response against cancer cells, inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and even protecting the healthy cells from chemotherapy’s toxic effects.

Melatonin’s involvement in regulation of circadian rhythms may help in the coordination and synchronization of internal body functions. The timings of he melatonin treatment may be grave in regard to their anti-cancer effects.

Senior author Yang Yang hopes that this information would prove helpful in the design of studies concerned with the therapeutic efficiency of melatonin in blood cancers.

Also read: Arthritis drug could cure blood cancer: Researchers

The researchers have noted that the anti-cancer actions of melatonin will be helpful in facilitating clinical applications and basic research.

The study has appeared in British Journal of Pharmacology.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha

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Do You Feel Sleepy Post-Lunch? Well, Take a Look at the Possible Reasons!

Feeling sleepy after lunch. Wish to take a nap. Heavy lunch makes you feel lethargic.

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Post lunch siesta in office hours . Pixabay.

New Delhi, August 22, 2017: Have you ever wondered that from the total office hours, why is it only post-lunch that you feel like slugging away? What could possibly be the reason behind these post-lunch slumps?

Most of the people tend to grab a bite from outside eateries. They eat anything that they feel like such as pasta, bread, burger etc., without even giving a thought to what kind of food they are in-taking. Is it high in protein, carbohydrate or fat? This thought never comes to their mind.

The main reason behind this drowsiness is not the lunch but what we consume in the lunch. It is basically due to the chemical changes in the body during the digestion process that you feel sleepiness.

After the meal, our body generates insulin to regulate blood-sugar levels. The amount of insulin released primarily depends on two main factors. First, the type of meal i.e, whether it is rich in protein, carbs or fat. The other factor is the size of the meal.

Heavy lunch in the office hours. Pixabay

If we have a large meal, then the amount of insulin released will be more and vice-versa. With the secretion of insulin, our body also produces Serotonin and Melatonin. Similar is the case with the protein-rich diet. The protein contains Tryptophan amino acids, which is used by the body to produce Serotonin.

Serotonin and Melatonin are basically neurotransmitters that have a calming effect and help regulate sleep. When they get metabolized in the brain, they induce drowsiness.

Moreover, the body streams more blood to the digestive system to digest food. If you opt for a heavy lunch, then post-lunch, your body would stream more blood to the digestive system. And for that period of time, most of your body’s energy would be used by your digestive system and not by your brain. This makes you feel lazy and forces you to go for a siesta.

So, do not opt for heavy lunch. Instead, have a heavy breakfast so as to set good energy level for the day and then eat small meals throughout the day. This is the way to adios to the post-lunch sleepiness.

prepared by a Shivani Chowdhary of NewsGram. Twitter @cshivani31

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Renowned Scientist Dr. Pushpa Mitra Bhargava Expires at his Prashant Nagar Residence in Uppal

This Indian scientist was internationally identified as a thinker, institution builder, and molecular biologist

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Science
Dr Pushpa Mitra Bhargava expired on Tuesday. Twitter
  • Dr. Pushpa Mitra Bhargava died on Tuesday after a brief illness
  • He was born in Ajmer on February 22, 1928, and had completed his Ph. D. from Lucknow University
  • He was internationally recognized as an institution builder, molecular biologist, and thinker.

Hyderabad, August 2, 2017: Pushpa Mitra Bhargava, the founder and director of the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) and a top Indian scientist died due to a brief illness on Tuesday.

As per his family members, Bhargava took his last breath at his Prashant Nagar residence in Uppal. He was 89 years-old and had a son and a daughter.

He was born on February 22, 1928, in Ajmer, and had completed his Ph. D. in synthetic chemistry from Lucknow University. Bhargava in 1953 went to the USA and filled in at the post of a project associate at a lab for research on cancer. He had a dynamic part in the revelation of 5-fluorouracil, which is an anti-cancer medication. He was employed at various research organizations in France and the United Kingdom. He had restricted the endorsement of GM in India and asked for a ban of no less than 15 years on hereditarily altered yields in the nation.

Also read: Indian Origin Scientist Part of Team that developed Asteroid flyby to help NASA test Global Tracking Network

His efforts and vision gave rise to the establishment of CCMB in 1977, an institute for basic biology research and seeking its application for the betterment of society.

The staff of CCMB expressed their condolence and profound sadness at his demise. He was a part of the production of nation building scientists who established Indian science. This Indian scientist was recognized as an institution builder, molecular biologist, and thinker at an international level.

His concerns and engagements covered art and culture as well as science and their link to society. He remained immensely engrossed in social issues, especially those related to the effect of science on society in India and the world. His extraordinary commitment and energy will continue to always motivate scientists in future ventures, said an official press release.

Bhargava is also the receiver of more than 100 national and international awards, including the Padma Bhushan, which is the third highest civilian award of the nation in 1986.  He was amid 100 scientists who had conveyed distress over “the ways in which science and reason were getting eroded” and “climate of intolerance” in a statement.

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Bhargava had communicated worry over “RSS people” going to a meeting of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) labs. He had cautioned that if the present pattern proceeded, India would not remain a democracy and turn into a theocratic nation like Pakistan.

He had additionally blamed Narendra Modi for expressing that India had known the procedure of organ transplantation long back at Indian Science Congress.

-prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter: @Hkaur1025

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How Social Interactions Help Provide Aid to Cancer Patients: Read Here!

Cancer patients are likely to respond better to the treatment when they are socially interactive

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Cancer
Cancer patients are likely to respond better to the treatment when they are socially interactive. Pixabay
  • Research by the National Human Genome Research Institute showed that social interaction between cancer patients may improve their response to treatment
  • Survival chances are likely to be increased by 2 percent when the patients are interactive during chemotherapy
  • People model behavior based on what’s around them

New Delhi, July 27, 2017: The recuperation of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy is affected by their social interaction with other patients during treatment, according to a new study by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

Cancer patients were a little more likely to survive for five years or more after chemotherapy if they interacted during chemotherapy with other patients who also survived for five years or more. The findings were published online July 12, 2017, in the journal Network Science.

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“People model behavior based on what’s around them,” Jeff Lienert, lead author in NHGRI’s Social and Behavioral Research Branch and a National Institutes of Health Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program fellow. “For example, you will often eat more when you’re dining with friends, even if you can’t see what they’re eating. When you’re bicycling, you will often perform better when you’re cycling with others, regardless of their performance.”

Researchers examined the data from electronic medical records from 2000 to 2009 from two major hospitals in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service. They also reviewed the room formation to confirm that the patients were positioned to interact.

“We had information on when patients checked in and out of the chemotherapy ward, a small intimate space where people could see and interact for a long period of time,” Lienert said. “We used ‘time spent getting chemotherapy in a room with others as a proxy for social connection.”

According to the ANI report, when patients were around those during chemotherapy who died in less than five years following chemotherapy, they had a 72 percent chance of dying within five years following their chemotherapy. The best outcome was when patients interacted with someone who survived for five years or longer: they had a 68 percent chance of dying within five years. The researchers’ model also predicted that if patients were isolated from other patients, they would have a 69.5 percent chance of dying within five years.

ALSO READ: Social interaction affects cancer patients’ response to treatment

“A two percent difference in survival – between being isolated during treatment and being with other patients – might not sound like a lot, but it’s pretty substantial,” Lienert said. “If you saw 5,000 patients in nine years, that 2 percent improvement would affect 100 people.”

The researchers didn’t study why the difference occurred, but hypothesize that it may be related to stress response. “When you’re stressed, stress hormones such as adrenaline are released, resulting in a fight or flight response,” Lienert said. “If you are then unable to fight or fly, such as in chemotherapy, these hormones can build up.”

While the researchers also didn’t investigate the impact of visitors on cancer patients undergoing therapy, the effect would likely be similar, he said.

“Positive social support during the exact moments of greatest stress is crucial,” Lienert said. “If you have a friend with cancer, keeping him or her company during chemotherapy probably will help reduce their stress. The impact is likely to be as effective, and possibly more effective than cancer patients interacting with other cancer patients.”

The findings are published online in the journal Network Science.

-Prepared by Nivedita Motwani. Twitter @Mind_Makeup


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