Sunday December 15, 2019

Melatonin May Help Treat Blood Cancers like Leukemia and Lymphoma, Claims a New Research

The researchers have noted that the anti-cancer actions of melatonin will be helpful in facilitating clinical applications and basic research

0
//
Melatonin produced by a gland in the brain can help treat blood cancers
Melatonin may help treat blood cancers. Pixabay
  • Researchers have discovered that Melatonin may help treat blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma 
  • Melatonin’s involvement in regulation of circadian rhythms may help in coordination and synchronization of internal body functions 
  • Anti-cancer actions of melatonin are expected to be helpful in facilitating basic research 

Washington D.C. [USA], September 3, 2017: Researchers have discovered that blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma may be treated with a hormone produced by a small gland in the brain.

Melatonin, a hormone produced by a small gland in the brain may be able to treat blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, according to the researchers.

The findings suggest that melatonin performs a number of tasks such as boosting the immune response against cancer cells, inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and even protecting the healthy cells from chemotherapy’s toxic effects.

Melatonin’s involvement in regulation of circadian rhythms may help in the coordination and synchronization of internal body functions. The timings of he melatonin treatment may be grave in regard to their anti-cancer effects.

Senior author Yang Yang hopes that this information would prove helpful in the design of studies concerned with the therapeutic efficiency of melatonin in blood cancers.

Also read: Arthritis drug could cure blood cancer: Researchers

The researchers have noted that the anti-cancer actions of melatonin will be helpful in facilitating clinical applications and basic research.

The study has appeared in British Journal of Pharmacology.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha

Next Story

AI Can Better Help Doctors to Identify Cancer Cells in Human Body

The process of manually identifying all the cells in a pathology slide is extremely labor intensive and error-prone

0
Cancer
The AI algorithm helps pathologists obtain the most accurate Cancer cell analysis - in a much faster way. Pixabay

Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern have developed a software tool that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to recognize Cancer cells from digital pathology images – giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.

The spatial distribution of different types of cells can reveal a cancer’s growth pattern, its relationship with the surrounding microenvironment, and the body’s immune response.

But the process of manually identifying all the cells in a pathology slide is extremely labor intensive and error-prone.

“To make a diagnosis, pathologists usually only examine several ‘representative’ regions in detail, rather than the whole slide. However, some important details could be missed by this approach,” said Dr. Guanghua “Andy” Xiao, corresponding author of a study published in EbioMedicine.

A major technical challenge in systematically studying the tumor microenvironment is how to automatically classify different types of cells and quantify their spatial distributions.

The AI algorithm that Dr Xiao and his team developed, called “ConvPath”, overcomes these obstacles by using AI to classify cell types from lung cancer pathology images.

Cancer
Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern have developed a software tool that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to recognize Cancer Cells from digital pathology images – giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes. Pixabay

The ConvPath algorithm can “look” at cells and identify their types based on their appearance in the pathology images using an AI algorithm that learns from human pathologists.

The algorithm helps pathologists obtain the most accurate cancer cell analysis – in a much faster way.

ALSO READ: Now Gmail Will Let You Send Emails as Attachment

“It is time-consuming and difficult for pathologists to locate very small tumour regions in tissue images, so this could greatly reduce the time that pathologists need to spend on each image,” said Dr Xiao. (IANS)