Sunday September 22, 2019
Home Lead Story Men Do Not Fo...

Men Do Not Forget Pain Easily as Compared to Women

When experiencing pain again, men seemed to be stressed and hypersensitive in remembering, but women were not stressed by their earlier experiences of pain. 

0
//
Couple
men don't forget pain easily as compared to women

Women tend to forget pain that they suffered more quickly than men, confirmed a new study in mice and humans, challenging the widely held belief that the fairer sex are more sensitive to pain than men.

The study, by researchers from Canada’s University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM), showed that men and women remembered earlier painful experiences differently.

While men (and male mice) remembered earlier painful experiences clearly, women (and female mice) did not seem to forget.

women are considered to forget pain easily than men 

When experiencing pain again, men seemed to be stressed and hypersensitive in remembering, but women were not stressed by their earlier experiences of pain.

“If remembered pain is a driving force for chronic pain and we understand how pain is remembered, we may be able to help some sufferers by treating the mechanisms behind the memories directly,” said lead author Loren Martin, Assistant Professor at the UTM.

“What was even more surprising was that men reacted more, because it is well known that women are both more sensitive to pain than men, and that they are also generally more stressed out,” Martin added.

For the study, published in the Current Biology journal, the team conducted experiments on both humans and mice where they were taken to specific rooms and made to experience low levels of pain caused by heat delivered to their hind paw or forearm.

Further, human participants were asked to wear a tightly inflated blood pressure cuff and exercise their arms for 20 minutes, while each mouse received a diluted injection of vinegar designed to cause a stomach ache for about 30 minutes.

Also Read: Nature Therapy Can Reduce Distress, Behavioural Problems in Kids

When the next day the participants returned to either the same or a different room and heat was again applied to their arms or hind paws, men rated the heat pain higher than they did the day before, and higher than the women did.

Similarly, male mice returning to the same environment exhibited a heightened heat pain response, while mice placed in a new and neutral environment did not. (IANS)

Next Story

Passive Presence of a Romantic Partner Can Reduce Pain: Researchers

Partner empathy was positively associated with pain tolerance and inversely associated with sensory pain experience

0
Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study
In stress? Remember your romantic partner and keep BP down. pixabay

Researchers have found that the passive presence of a romantic partner can reduce pain and that partner empathy may buffer affective distress during pain exposure.

The study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, confirmed the analgesic effects of social support — even without verbal or physical contact.

The research team assessed sensitivity to pressure pain in 48 heterosexual couples with each participant tested alone and in the passive presence of their partner.

Dispositional empathy was quantified by a questionnaire.

care
Most importantly when your partner decides to confess, instead of attacking him/her, show your empathy and try to solve the issue. Pixabay

In the presence, as compared to the absence, of their partners both men and women exhibited higher pain thresholds and tolerance as well as lower sensory and affective pain ratings on constant pressure stimuli.

Partner empathy was positively associated with pain tolerance and inversely associated with sensory pain experience.

Also Read: This is How Your Brain Senses an itch

“Repeatedly, talking and touching have been shown to reduce pain, but our research shows that even the passive presence of a romantic partner can reduce it and that partner empathy may buffer affective distress during pain exposure,” said Stefan Duschek, Professor at UMIT in Austria. (IANS)