Sunday June 16, 2019

Men Have Greater Endurance for Stress, says Study

For the study, the researchers reviewed the cases of 572 men evaluated for anti-incontinence surgery between 2007 and 2017

0
//
custom writing
Most reliable custom writing services will allow you to check for plagiarism after providing you a comprehensive plagiarism report for free.

Men often tolerate stress urinary incontinence (SUI) for more than two years before seeking medical help and one-third put up with it for more than five years, a new study suggests.

SUI occurs when physical activity or exertion — a cough, heavy lifting, exercise — causes the bladder to leak urine.

The study, published in the journal Urology, found the median length of time the men had waited to seek treatment for their SUI was 32 months, with almost a third having waited more than five years.

They also found that patients in their 80s had waited a median of more than seven years.

“Male SUI is rare but is known to have significant negative psychosocial and emotional effects and represents a common reason for post-treatment anxiety and depression,” said co-author Allen Morey, Professor at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre in the US.

Stress
They also found that patients in their 80s had waited a median of more than seven years. Pixabay

But there are simple and safe solutions — including minor surgeries — that can either help boost a weakened sphincter muscle for patients with minimal leakage (the sling procedure), or replace the sphincter muscle altogether (installation of an artificial urinary sphincter) for more severe cases of leakage, the researcher said.

“Using new diagnostic techniques, we are now able to accurately diagnose and streamline treatment recommendations to resolve this bothersome problem for our patients,” Morey mentioned.

For the study, the researchers reviewed the cases of 572 men evaluated for anti-incontinence surgery between 2007 and 2017.

Also Read- Spitzer Telescope of NASA Marks 15 Years in Space

The study calls on men’s general practitioners and urologists to perform a standing cough test, in which a patient coughs while the doctor watches for any accidental urine release, as a routine part of their male patients’ physicals.

“Our goal is to spread the word that effective and safe treatments exist for men with stress urinary incontinence, but also to facilitate an immediate and accurate diagnosis among stress urinary incontinence patients,” said first author Joceline Fuchs from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Don’t Stand and Eat, it May Up Stress and also Mute Taste Buds

The vestibular sense, which is responsible for balance, posture and spatial orientation, interacts with the gustatory sensory system

0
Stress, Taste Buds, Eat
Posture impacts taste perception, with food tasting better when you are sitting down. Pixabay

Researchers have found that spending more time standing up and eating for even a few minutes prompts physical stress, muting taste buds.

The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Research finds posture impacts taste perception, with food tasting better when you are sitting down.

The researchers looked specifically at how the vestibular sense, which is responsible for balance, posture and spatial orientation, interacts with the gustatory sensory system, which impacts taste and flavour.

“This finding suggests that parents might be able to make unpleasant-tasting, healthy foods seem more palatable to reluctant children by having them eat standing up (vs. sitting down). In a similar vein, it might be beneficial to maintain a standing posture when consuming pharmaceutical products that have unpleasant tastes,” said study lead author Dipayan Biswas, Professor at the University of South Florida in the US.

Stress, Taste Buds, Eat
Spending more time standing up and eating for even a few minutes prompts physical stress. Pixabay

The research team found that the force of gravity pushes blood to the lower parts of the body, causing the heart to work harder to pump blood back up to the top of the body, accelerating heart rate.

This activates the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and leads to increased concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol.

This chain reaction reduces sensory sensitivity, which impacts food and beverage taste evaluation, food temperature perception and overall consumption volume.

When people experience discomfort, foods that normally taste good do not appear as pleasant to the palate, said the study.

Also Read- SIAM Urge Government to Hold Wider Consultations, Follow Practical Approach on Electric Vehicles

The research team confirmed their hypothesis by having 350 participants rate the tastiness of a pita chip. Those who were standing gave it a less favourable rating than those who were sitting in a padded chair.

They expanded the study by inducing additional stress and asked participants to try fruit snacks while carrying a shopping bag. Both sitting and standing participants reported the additional weight made the food item taste even worse. (IANS)