Sunday September 22, 2019

Men in India Prone to Develop Lifestyle Diseases in Their 30s

However, for women this high risk becomes a reality once they cross the age of 50 -- the risk being highest between the ages of 50-59

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Men, India, Lifestyle Diseases
Indian men between the ages of 30-44 years have a high incidence of high LDL --low density lipoprotein, or the so called "bad cholesterol" -- one of the major causes for a variety of lifestyle diseases, showed the findings from the survey by home diagnostic service provider Healthians. Pixabay

While men in India are prone to develop lifestyle diseases in their 30s, women tend to develop them a couple of decades later – in their 50s, says a study.

Indian men between the ages of 30-44 years have a high incidence of high LDL –low density lipoprotein, or the so called “bad cholesterol” — one of the major causes for a variety of lifestyle diseases, showed the findings from the survey by home diagnostic service provider Healthians.

However, for women this high risk becomes a reality once they cross the age of 50 — the risk being highest between the ages of 50-59.

“These disturbing statistics force us to focus on the sorry state of our work force,” Deepak Sahni, Founder and CEO of Healthians, said in a statement.

Men, India, Lifestyle Diseases
While men in India are prone to develop lifestyle diseases in their 30s, women tend to develop them a couple of decades later – in their 50s, says a study. Pixabay

“India’s biggest economic strength is having one of the youngest working populations in the world. However, the health of this valuable asset seems to be balanced on a knife’s edge,” Sahni added.

The findings are based on a study of more than 4 lakh patients across different age groups and locations conducted over a period of one year.

According to a joint report prepared by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Economic Forum, lifestyle diseases account for almost 60 per cent of deaths worldwide and are responsible for almost 44 per cent of premature deaths.

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“The silver lining on this gloomy cloud is the fact that lifestyle diseases are mostly controllable. Some changes in diet, adequate and appropriate exercise and most importantly, regular preventive health check-ups can go a long way in making such statistics far more palatable,” said Manjula Sardana, Head of Quality at Healthians. (IANS)

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India To Become Global Steel Manufacturing Hub By 2031

The Modi government seems determined to boost the country's crude steel production capacity to 300 MT by 2030-31 in a bid to make India a global steel manufacturing hub

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steel, manufacturing, india, global
Modi government seems determined to boost the country's crude steel production capacity. Wikimedia Commons

The Modi government seems determined to boost the country’s crude steel production capacity to 300 MT by 2030-31 in a bid to make India a global steel manufacturing hub.

At present, China is the world’s largest steel producer with a production capacity of 928.3 MT of crude steel (2018), while India, with 106.5 MT of crude steel production, ranks second on the list. Dedicated participation of all stakeholders is a must to achieve the projected capacity target of 300 MT by 2030-31.

To deliberate on major issues plaguing the sector, the Ministry of Steel is organising in Delhi on Monday a day-long conclave, during which Steel Minister Dharmendra Pradhan will seek suggestions from the stakeholders to address its challenges, identify opportunities and arrive at tangible interventions that can aid the growth of the Indian steel industry.

The National Steel Policy 2017 envisages ‘creating a self-sufficient steel industry that is technologically advanced, globally competitive and promotes inclusive growth’.

Being the third largest steel consumer in the world after China and USA, India’s per capita steel consumption at 74 kgs is one-third the global average of 225 kgs.

steel, manufacturing, india, global
Being the third largest steel consumer in the world after China and USA, India’s per capita steel consumption at 74 kgs is one-third the global average of 225 kgs. Wikimedia Commons

Various countries have focused on rapidly increasing their steel consumption in the high growth phase of their economy. At present, India’s majority steel demand comes from construction, infrastructure, automobiles and capital goods, among others.

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Steel intensive construction offers an increased pace of durable and environmentally sustainable construction. Its recyclable nature also contributes to the circular economy.

The government has set a target to make India a $5 trillion economy by 2024-25, therefore promoting domestic steel industry is essential, given its high GDP multiplier and critical role in the construction and infrastructure sectors, said the Ministry. (IANS)