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Men Initiate Sex 3 Times More Often Than Women, Says Study

The longer the relationship had lasted, the less often the couples had sex

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Every couple must try to spend quality time together to improve communication. Pixabay

Men initiate sex more than three times as often as women do in a long-term, heterosexual relationship, says a study.

The researchers investigated what are the other factors which play a role for the frequency of intercourse in couples in long-term relationships.

The study, published in the journal Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, suggests that two factors are decisive in how often women take the initiative at all — their attitude towards casual sex and passion.

The researchers considered several factors in their study such as how happy people are in their relationship, how committed they feel to their partner, how intimate they are, how much they trust each other and the love between them.

“Passion in the relationship is of great importance for intercourse frequency,” said the study’s first author Trond Viggo Grontvedt from Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Representational image.

“Passion is actually the only one of these factors that matter. We didn’t find any association between any of the other aspects and how often people have sex in couple relationships,” he added.

The study included 92 couples aged between 19 and 30. Relationships varied in length from one month to nine years, with an average of just under two years. The couples had sex two to three times a week on an average.

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The longer the relationship had lasted, the less often the couples had sex.

The study also revealed that desire for others reduces passion. “Strong sexual fantasies about others than the partner don’t mix well with passion in a relationship,” said Mons Bendixen, Associate Professor at NTNU. (IANS)

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Why Do Women Face Higher Heart Disease Risk after Breast Cancer? Find Out Here!

The cardiovascular effects may occur more than five years after radiation exposure

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Women, Heart Disease, Breast Cancer
Heart disease appears more commonly in women treated for breast cancer because of the toxicities of chemotherapy. Pixabay

Researchers have found that postmenopausal women with breast cancer are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

“Heart disease appears more commonly in women treated for breast cancer because of the toxicities of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and use of aromatase inhibitors, which lower estrogen,” said JoAnn Pinkerton, Professor at the University of Virginia.

The cardiovascular effects may occur more than five years after radiation exposure, with the risk persisting for up to 30 years.

“Heart-healthy lifestyle modifications will decrease both the risk of recurrent breast cancer and the risk of developing heart disease,” Pinkerton said.

Women, Heart Disease, Breast Cancer
Researchers have found that postmenopausal women with breast cancer are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Pixabay

The goal of the study was to compare and evaluate risk factors for cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women who are survivors of breast cancer and women without breast cancer.

For the findings, more than 90 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors were compared with 192 postmenopausal women.

The researchers found that postmenopausal women who are survivors of breast cancer showed a markedly stronger association with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, atherosclerosis, hypertriglyceridemia and abdominal obesity, which are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

The risk of cardiovascular mortality similarly increased to match death rates from cancer itself.

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“Women should schedule a cardiology consultation when breast cancer is diagnosed and continue with ongoing follow-up after cancer treatments are completed,” she added.

The study was published in the Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society. (IANS)