Saturday February 23, 2019
Home Life Style Beauty Tips Seven Myths W...

Seven Myths Women Attach to Men’s Beauty

Let's talk about myths concerning men's beauty one by one below

0
//
Men's beauty
Myths gripping men's beauty. Lifetimestock

August 31, 2017: Men too like women crave to look ‘beautiful,’ although the term is supplanted by a more masculine word, that is, ‘Handsome.’ Men also worry about their skin. Nevertheless, there exist some myths revolving around the men’s beauty, and many men hold them true.

Let’s talk about myths concerning men’s beauty one by one:

Myth #1 

Shaved chests are good

Chest must never more be shaved, dear men. It increases the hair growth and develops rashes.

Myth #2

Beauty related practices are only for women

This claim is bogus, in fact, there are many beauty treatments for men as well.

Myth #3

Men have oily skin. So why moisturize? 

No, that’s not true. The skin releases oil because of lack of water. To keep the skin hydrated, drink lots of water and apply a gel instead of cream.

Myth #4

Use body soap. Men do not have sensitive skin

Body soaps dry out the skin, which can trigger skin allergy and form cracks.

Myth #5 

Men do not require a shaving gel

Shaving without the shaving gel may form cuts on the face, which is very dangerous.

Also Read: Men Prefer Compassion Over Beauty in Women: Survey 

Myth #6

Men should wash their face several times after playing outdoors

Regular facial cleansing dries out the skin and prompts the oil glands to release more oil. Thus, it is always suggested to wash your face 2-3 times a day.

Myth #7

Men keep no sunscreen at home

Even while sitting at your home, Ultra rays may catch up on you and harm the skin. So keep one at home too.


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

 

Next Story

Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

0
women
The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

diet drinks
A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

diet
Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

Also Read: Top 3 Factors That Play a Major Role in Fertility Issues in Women

“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)