Tuesday December 10, 2019

Study Says, Men With Breast Cancer Face High Mortality Rates

The study used 11 years of registry data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014, which included 1.8 million female and 16,025 male patients

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Men
Other factors that might influence mortality rates among Men could be lifestyle factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and obesity. Pixabay

Men with breast cancer are more likely to have lower overall survival rates than their female counterparts, a study said.

“The persistent disparity, derived from an analysis of data from the National Cancer Database, suggests a possible distinct cancer biology, less effective treatment or compliance issues, and perhaps unhealthy lifestyles among men may be responsible for the lower overall survival rates,” said the study’s senior author Xiao-Ou Shu from the Vanderbilt University in the US.

The five-year mortality rate for men was 19 per cent higher than women, according to the research published in the journal JAMA Oncology.

The study used 11 years of registry data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014, which included 1.8 million female and 16,025 male patients.

About 85 per cent of male breast cancer is Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, a proportion that is higher than female breast cancer patients (75 per cent).

“That is a cancer type where patients usually fare better because we have a hormonal treatment.

“We have a lot of treatment options for that type of breast cancer. In theory, men should have better outcomes and have lower mortality as women do if the treatment is equally effective,” Shu said.

According to the researchers, previous studies have shown that men might not be as compliant with hormonal treatments as women.

Men
The five-year mortality rate for Men was 19 per cent higher than women, according to the research published in the journal JAMA Oncology. Pixabay

Other factors that might influence mortality rates among men could be lifestyle factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and obesity.

Clinical characteristics and under treatments were associated with 63 per cent of the sex-related mortality disparity.

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“The bottom line is that we need more studies specifically focused on male breast cancer,” Shu added. (IANS)

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Global Warming Can Make You Fall ill More Often: Study

The study said that increased heat may cause illness through undernourishment in a number of ways: reducing appetites, provoking more alcohol consumption, reducing motivation or ability to shop and cook and exacerbate any undernutrition

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Global Warming
Global Warming is one of the biggest threats to the reduction of hunger and undernutrition, especially in low and middle-income countries. Pixabay

Global Warming is likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure, researchers have warned.

For the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researhers analysed daily hospitalisation data covering almost 80 per cent of Brazil between 2000 and 2015.

They studied the link between daily mean temperatures and hospitalisation for undernourishment according to the International Classification of Diseases.

“The association between increased heat and hospitalisation for undernutrition was greatest for individuals aged over 80, and those 5 to 19 years,” said the researchers from Monash University, Australia.

The researchers found that for every 1 degree Celsius increase in daily mean temperature during the hot season, there was a 2.5 per cent increase in the number of hospitalisations for undernutrition.

“We estimated that 15.6 per cent of undernutrition hospitalisations could be attributed to heat exposure during the study period,” said study’s lead author Yuming Guo.

Global Warming
Global Warming is likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure, researchers have warned. Pixabay

The study said that increased heat may cause illness through undernourishment in a number of ways: reducing appetites, provoking more alcohol consumption, reducing motivation or ability to shop and cook and exacerbate any undernutrition, resulting in hospitalisation.

“Climate change is one of the biggest threats to the reduction of hunger and undernutrition, especially in low and middle-income countries. It has been estimated that climate change will reduce global food availability by 3.2 per cent and thus cause about 30,000 underweight-related deaths by 2050,” the report said.

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“It is plausible to speculate that climate changes could not only increase the rate of undernutrition in the most affected areas of the globe, but at the same time, impair individuals’ capacity to adapt to projected rises in temperature,” said the researchers. (IANS)