Saturday December 14, 2019

Mental Health Problems More Common in People Living Alone

The researchers also suggest that interventions, which tackle loneliness, might aid the mental well-being of individuals living alone

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mental health, living alone
The study found that the prevalence of people living alone in 1993, 2000, and 2007 was 8.8 per cent, 9.8 per cent, and 10.7 per cent. Pixabay

Mental health problems are more common in people living alone regardless of age and sex, says a study.

“The prevalence of common mental disorders was higher in individuals living alone than in those not living alone in all survey years,” the study noted.

For the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers used data on 20,500 individuals aged 16-64 living in England who participated in the 1993, 2000, or 2007 National Psychiatric Morbidity Surveys.

Whether a person had a common mental disorder (CMD) was assessed using the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R), a questionnaire focusing on neurotic symptoms.

The study found that the prevalence of people living alone in 1993, 2000, and 2007 was 8.8 per cent, 9.8 per cent, and 10.7 per cent.

mental health
“This indicates that unhealthy lifestyle habits, long working hours and work-life imbalance are taking a toll on people and their mental health,” the Practo report said.
Pixabay

They found a positive association between living alone and common mental disorder.

In different subgroups of people, living alone increased a person’s risk for common mental disorder by 1.39 to 2.43 times, the study said.

“Living alone is positively associated with common mental disorders in the general population in England,” said study co-author Louis Jacob from the University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines in France.

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Globally, the lifetime prevalence of CMDs is around 30 per cent. These disorders have a major impact on quality of life, physical illness and mortality.

The researchers also suggest that interventions, which tackle loneliness, might aid the mental well-being of individuals living alone. (IANS)

Next Story

Men and Women with Mental Disorders Die Prematurely

In addition to looking at premature mortality, we were able to explore specific causes of death such as cancer, diabetes and suicide

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Men, Women, Mental Disorders
We investigated how mortality rates changed for each type of disorder, for each age, for males and females. Pixabay

As compared to the general population, average life expectancy is respectively 10 and seven years shorter for men and women with mental disorders, says a new study.

The study, published in the journal The Lancet, explores mortality for those with different types of mental disorders.

“We investigated how mortality rates changed for each type of disorder, for each age, for males and females. In addition to looking at premature mortality, we were able to explore specific causes of death such as cancer, diabetes and suicide,” said study lead author Oleguer Plana-Ripoll from Aarhus University in Denmark.

Based on data from 7.4 million people living in Denmark between 1995 and 2015, the findings provide new insights into how mental disorders impact the lives of people with disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and substance use disorders.

Men, Women, Mental Disorders
The study, published in the journal The Lancet, explores mortality for those with different types of mental disorders. Pixabay

When looking at differences in life expectancy, the researchers found that men and women with mental disorders on average had life expectancies respectively 10 and seven years shorter after the diagnosis of the disease compared to an overall Danish person of the same age.

For example, people with depression or another type of mood disorder, which are among the most common mental disorders, had higher mortality rates.

“Apart from an increased risk of death due to suicide, we also confirm an increased risk of death due to somatic conditions such as cancer, respiratory diseases, diabetes etc.,” Plana-Ripoll said.

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“We found that men and women with mood disorders experienced life expectancies respectively 7.9 and 6.2 years shorter after disease diagnosis compared to the overall Danish person with the same age,” Plana-Ripoll added. (IANS)