Thursday January 23, 2020

Metabolic Surgery may Significantly Reduce Risk of Death from Heart Complications

The striking results that we saw after metabolic surgery may be related to the patients' substantial and sustained weight loss

0
//
Metabolic Surgery, Death, Heart
The surgery also help patients with Type-2 diabetes and obesity in controlling the condition and in treatment of cardiovascular diseases compared with people undergoing usual medical care, according to the findings. Pixabay

In addition to reducing weight, bariatric or metabolic surgery may significantly reduce risk of death from heart complications, says a study.

The surgery also help patients with Type-2 diabetes and obesity in controlling the condition and in treatment of cardiovascular diseases compared with people undergoing usual medical care, according to the findings.

“The striking results that we saw after metabolic surgery may be related to the patients’ substantial and sustained weight loss,” said the study’s lead author Ali Aminian, a bariatric surgeon at Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, the USA.

“There is a growing body of evidence to suggest beneficial metabolic and hormonal changes after the surgical procedures that are independent of weight loss,” Aminian said.

Metabolic Surgery, Death, Heart
In addition to reducing weight, bariatric or metabolic surgery may significantly reduce risk of death from heart complications, says a study. Pixabay

The study compared nearly 2,300 patients who underwent metabolic surgery with 11,500 patients with similar characteristics but under usual medical care.

Patients underwent one of the four types of weight-loss surgery — gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric banding, or duodenal switch.

The primary endpoint of the study was occurrence of death due to one of the five major complications associated with obesity and diabetes — coronary artery events, cerebrovascular issues, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and kidney disease.

Over an eight-year period, it was found that patients of metabolic surgery were 40 per cent less likely to experience one of these events than those receiving usual medical care.

Also Read- Google Play Store Adds UPI as Payment Option for Its Users in India

Patients in the surgical group were 41 per cent less likely to die from any of these causes and had 15 per cent greater weight loss and lower blood sugar levels. They used less medication, including insulin, and less heart medications, like blood pressure and cholesterol therapies, compared with the non-surgery group.

The results were presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Paris, France, and also published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (IANS)

Next Story

People with Inadequate Food Access Likely to Die Prematurely: Study

Inadequate food access linked to premature mortality

0
Dying Prematurely
People with inadequate access to food due to financial constraints are more likely to die prematurely. Pixabay

Researchers have found a latest health news that people with inadequate access to food due to financial constraints are 10 to 37 per cent more likely to die prematurely from any cause other than cancer, compared to food-secure people.

“Among adults who died prematurely, those experiencing severe food insecurity died at an age nine years earlier than their food-secure counterparts,” said study lead author Fei Men from the University of Toronto in Canada.

For the study, published in the journal CMAJ, researchers looked at data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2005-2017 on more than half a million adults in Canada.

They categorised people as food secure, or marginally, moderately or severely food insecure.

Dying Prematurely food
Among adults who died prematurely, those experiencing severe food insecurity died at an age nine years earlier than their food-secure counterparts. Pixabay

By the end of the study period, 25 460 people had died prematurely, with people who were severely food insecure dying nine years younger than their food-secure counterparts (59.5 years old versus 68.9 years).

Previous studies have examined the relation between inadequate food and death, although none looked at causes of death.

The average life expectancy in Canada in 2008-2014 was 82 years; deaths at or before that age were considered premature in this study.

Severely food-insecure adults were more likely to die prematurely than their food-secure counterparts for all causes except cancers, the study said.

Also Read- Video Games May Have Positive Impact on Kids: 71% Parents

Premature death by infectious-parasitic diseases, unintentional injuries and suicides was more than twice as likely for those experiencing severe versus no food insecurity, it added.

“The significant correlations of all levels of food insecurity with potentially avoidable deaths imply that food-insecure adults benefit less from public health efforts to prevent and treat diseases and injuries than their food-secure counterparts,” the researchers said. (IANS)