Tuesday January 21, 2020
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Mexico to Relocate 120 Central American Migrants

The migrants will be transported before February 22 to Monterrey, Hermosillo, Reynosa, Saltillo and Acuna.

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US, mexico
The image shows the border of USA and Mexico. Pixabay

The Mexican city of Piedras Negras, which borders the US, has announced to relocate a group of 120 Central American migrants after altercations that left four people injured in recent days.

The migrants will be transported before February 22 to Monterrey, Hermosillo, Reynosa, Saltillo and Acuna, where they have been promised formal work, Efe news quoted authorities as saying on Thursday.

Of the group of 1,672 Central American migrants who arrived in Piedras Negras on February 4, 1,400 still remain in the city, the others having been repatriated, relocated in shelters in other cities or having acquired jobs. At least 40 managed to legally enter the US, authorities said.

Mexico, US
The decision to relocate the 120 migrants was made after the migrants staged a protest at the shelters where they had been housed. Pixabay

The decision to relocate the 120 migrants was made after the migrants staged a protest at the shelters where they had been housed.

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Meanwhile, in Eagle Pass, Texas, across the border from Piedras Negras, the US Defence Department has not lowered its guard and at least 2,000 troops and immigration personnel have been deployed to prevent migrants from illegally entering the US. (IANS)

Next Story

Mexico Mammoths: Human-Built Woolly Mammoth Traps Found in Tultepec

Researchers speculated that ancient hunters probably chased the giant animals into the pits, which are 1.70 meters deep and 25 meters in diameter

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Mexico, Mammoths, Human
In this undated photo released by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, mammoth bones lie at an excavation site in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City. VOA

Anthropologists have found skeletons of at least 14 woolly mammoths that died after falling into traps built by humans 15,000 years ago.

The two pits were found in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said this week.

Researchers speculated that ancient hunters probably chased the giant animals into the pits, which are 1.70 meters deep and 25 meters in diameter (5½ feet by 82 feet).

There was some evidence that some of the mammals had been butchered.

Mexico, Mammoths, Human
The two pits were found in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said this week. Pixabay

Luis Cordoba, the head of the excavation team, said the discovery was key in studying the relationship between prehistoric hunting and gathering communities and the huge herbivores.

“There was little evidence before that hunters attacked mammoths. It was thought they frightened them into getting stuck in swamps and then waited for them to die,” he told reporters. “This is evidence of direct attacks on mammoths. In Tultepec we can see there was the intention to hunt and make use of the mammoths.”

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The pits were found when crews were digging in the area to build a garbage dump.  (VOA)