Wednesday December 12, 2018

Is Migraine Linked to Ear Disorders?

The researchers hypothesized that these abnormalities could be a result of compromised blood supply to the auditory system due to the migraine attacks

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Migraine
Migraine is a risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss -- characterized by rapid loss of hearing in one or both ears, which may occur immediately or over the course of several days. Pixabay
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People with chronic migraines may be at an increased risk of developing tinnitus — feeling of ringing in the ears — and other inner ear disorders, than those without the severe headache condition, says a study.

The researchers found that the risk of cochlear disorders, especially for tinnitus, was found to be significantly higher among patients with a history of migraines.

The study may support the presence and/or concept of “cochlear migraine”, said researchers including Juen-Haur Hwang from Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Taiwan.

Cochlear disorders are a condition that affect “snail shell shaped” part of the inner ear which receives sound in the form of vibrations and includes tinnitus, sensorineural hearing impairment, and/or sudden deafness.

The researchers found that the risk of cochlear disorders, especially for tinnitus, was found to be significantly higher among patients with a history of migraines.
The researchers found that the risk of cochlear disorders, especially for tinnitus, was found to be significantly higher among patients with a history of migraines. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, the team included data from 1,056 patients with a history of migraines and 4,224 controls.

The cumulative incidence of cochlear disorders in the migraine cohort was significantly higher by 12.2 per cent than that in the matched non-migraine cohort of nearly six per cent.

Subgroup analysis showed that compared with the non-migraine cohort, the adjusted hazard ratios in the migraine cohort were 3.30 for tinnitus, 1.03 for sensorineural hearing impairment, and 1.22 for sudden deafness, suggesting that people with migraine history are more susceptible to developing tinnitus than any other form of cochlear disorders.

Also Read: High BP Medicine May Help Treat Migraine

Another study, published in the journal Cephalalgia, showed that migraine is a risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss — characterized by rapid loss of hearing in one or both ears, which may occur immediately or over the course of several days.

The researchers hypothesized that these abnormalities could be a result of compromised blood supply to the auditory system due to the migraine attacks. (IANS)

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Migraine With Visual Aura May Increase Risk of Irregular Heartbeat

"Atrial fibrillation can be managed through medication, but many people do not realise that they have atrial fibrillation," Sen noted

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Migraine
Migraines that affect vision may increase irregular heartbeat risk. Pixabay

People who experience migraine with visual aura may have an increased risk of irregular heartbeat, and as a result stroke, say researchers including one of an Indian-origin.

Migraine with visual aura is when disturbances in vision occur right before the head pain begins. Those disturbances may include seeing wavy lines or flashes of light, or having blurry vision or blind spots.

With an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, the heart’s normal rhythm is out of sync. As a result, blood may pool in the heart, possibly forming clots that may go to the brain, causing a stroke.

The study suggested that atrial fibrillation may play a role in stroke in those with migraine with visual aura.

“It is important to note that people with migraine with aura may be at a higher risk of atrial fibrillation due to problems with the autonomic nervous system, which helps control the heart and blood vessels,” said Souvik Sen, from the University of South Carolina in the US.

Migraine
The study suggested that atrial fibrillation may play a role in stroke in those with migraine with visual aura.

For the study, published in the journal, Neurology, the team examined 11,939 people with an average age of 60 without prior atrial fibrillation or stroke were evaluated for headache.

The results revealed an estimated nine out of 1,000 people with migraine with aura suffer atrial fibrillation compared to seven out of 1,000 people with migraine without aura.

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The rate of stroke in the migraine with aura group was four out of 1,000 people annually compared to two out of 1,000 people annually in those with migraine without aura, and three of 1,000 people annually in those with no headache, the findings suggested.

“Atrial fibrillation can be managed through medication, but many people do not realise that they have atrial fibrillation,” Sen noted. (IANS)