Tuesday January 21, 2020

According to New Study, Migraine Raises Risk of Chronic Dry Eye Disease

For men, aged 65 or above, having migraine nearly doubled the odds of dry eye disease, and risk in women of the same age was almost 2.5 times

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Migraine, dry eyes
"Physicians caring for patients with a history of migraine headaches should be aware that these patients may be at risk for concurrent dry eye disease. Pixabay

Suffering from migraine? You could be at higher odds of having chronic dry eye disease, says a new study.

The chronic dry eye is a common disease in which natural tears fail to adequately lubricate the eyes, thus affecting its functioning and lessening a person’s quality of life.

The study showed that people with migraine had a 20 per cent higher risk of having dry eye disease, the HealthDay reported.

For men, aged 65 or above, having migraine nearly doubled the odds of dry eye disease, and risk in women of the same age was almost 2.5 times.

migraine, dry eyes
The study showed that people with migraine had a 20 per cent higher risk of having dry eye disease, the HealthDay reported. Pixabay

The association between migraine and dry eye was found to be more among the elderly, particularly for women due to hormonal changes caused by pregnancy, the use of oral contraceptives and menopause, the researchers said.

“Physicians caring for patients with a history of migraine headaches should be aware that these patients may be at risk for concurrent dry eye disease,” said Richard Davis, ophthalmologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the US.

For the study, the team examined 73,000 adults.

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology, showed 8-34 per cent of adults may be affected by dry eye disease.

Further, similar underlying inflammatory processes at the cellular level are known to play key roles in both dry eye disease and migraine.

migraine, dry eyes
Excessive dryness of the eye’s surface might work on key nerve pathways to help trigger migraines, they added. Pixabay

“Inflammatory changes in dry eye disease might trigger similar events in neuromuscular tissue, leading to the development and propagation of migraine headaches,” the team noted.

 

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Excessive dryness of the eye’s surface might work on key nerve pathways to help trigger migraines, they added.

In addition, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, thyroid problems, exposure to smoke, wind and dry climates, and long-term use of contact lenses can also lead to dry eyes, the study noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Sleep Disturbances can Trigger Migraine Attacks: Study

Sleep disturbance linked to migraine risk

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sleep migraine
A disturbed sleep can affect patients with Migraine. Pixabay

Researchers have found that nearly half of all patients who suffer migraines report sleep disturbance as a trigger for their headaches.

The research team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in US conducted a study using objective measures of sleep to date to evaluate the relationship between sleep and migraine headaches.

The study’s findings, published in the journal Neurology, generally support patients’ reports of sleep disturbance as a trigger for migraines.

In the assessments and actigraphy measurements, the research team observed that sleep fragmentation — time spent in bed, but not asleep — was linked to migraine onset not on the next day but rather the day after that.

“Sleep is multi-dimensional, and when we look at certain aspects such as sleep, we found that low sleep efficiency, which is the amount of time you’re awake in bed when you’re trying to sleep, was associated with migraines not on the day immediately following, but on the day after that,” said study researcher Suzanne Bertisch from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre in US.

Migraine
Time spent in bed, but not being asleep is linked to migraine onset not on the next day but a day after that. Pixabay

For the results, Bertisch and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study of 98 adults with episodic migraines, who reported at least two headaches, but had fewer than 15 days each month with a headache.

The participants completed electronic diaries twice a day, recording details about their sleep, headaches and health habits for six weeks.

During that time, they also wore a wrist actigraph to bed to objectively capture their sleep patterns.

The team adjusted data for other migraine triggers, including daily caffeine intake, alcohol intake, physical activity, stress and more.

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Over the course of six weeks, participants reported 870 headaches. Nightly sleep duration of 6.5 hours or less and poor sleep quality were not associated with migraines the day immediately following (Day Zero) or the day after that (Day One).

However, sleep fragmentation measured by both diary and actigraphy were associated with higher odds of having a migraine on Day One, the study said. (IANS)