Thursday November 21, 2019

Migraine With Visual Aura May Increase Risk of Irregular Heartbeat

"Atrial fibrillation can be managed through medication, but many people do not realise that they have atrial fibrillation," Sen noted

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Migraine
Migraines that affect vision may increase irregular heartbeat risk. Pixabay

People who experience migraine with visual aura may have an increased risk of irregular heartbeat, and as a result stroke, say researchers including one of an Indian-origin.

Migraine with visual aura is when disturbances in vision occur right before the head pain begins. Those disturbances may include seeing wavy lines or flashes of light, or having blurry vision or blind spots.

With an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, the heart’s normal rhythm is out of sync. As a result, blood may pool in the heart, possibly forming clots that may go to the brain, causing a stroke.

The study suggested that atrial fibrillation may play a role in stroke in those with migraine with visual aura.

“It is important to note that people with migraine with aura may be at a higher risk of atrial fibrillation due to problems with the autonomic nervous system, which helps control the heart and blood vessels,” said Souvik Sen, from the University of South Carolina in the US.

Migraine
The study suggested that atrial fibrillation may play a role in stroke in those with migraine with visual aura.

For the study, published in the journal, Neurology, the team examined 11,939 people with an average age of 60 without prior atrial fibrillation or stroke were evaluated for headache.

The results revealed an estimated nine out of 1,000 people with migraine with aura suffer atrial fibrillation compared to seven out of 1,000 people with migraine without aura.

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The rate of stroke in the migraine with aura group was four out of 1,000 people annually compared to two out of 1,000 people annually in those with migraine without aura, and three of 1,000 people annually in those with no headache, the findings suggested.

“Atrial fibrillation can be managed through medication, but many people do not realise that they have atrial fibrillation,” Sen noted. (IANS)

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Drinking Three or More Servings of Caffeinated Beverages a Day Increases Risk of Migraine

In a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers evaluated the role of caffeinated beverages as a potential trigger of migraine

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Caffeinated, Beverages, Migraine
Drinking three or more servings of caffeinated beverages a day increases the risk of migraine. Pixabay

Coffee lovers, please take note. Drinking three or more servings of caffeinated beverages a day increases the risk of migraine.

In a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers evaluated the role of caffeinated beverages as a potential trigger of migraine.

They found that, among patients who experience episodic migraine, one to two servings of caffeinated beverages were not associated with headaches on that day, but three or more servings of caffeinated beverages may be associated with higher odds of migraine headache occurrence on that day or the following day.

“While some potential triggers – such as lack of sleep – may only increase migraine risk, the role of caffeine is particularly complex, because it may trigger an attack but may also help control symptoms, caffeine’s impact depends both on dose and on frequency,” said Elizabeth Mostofsky from Harvard University.

Caffeinated, Beverages, Migraine
Coffee lovers, please take note. Pixabay

During the study, 98 adults with frequent episodic migraine completed electronic diaries every morning and every evening for at least six weeks.

Every day, participants reported the total servings of caffeinated coffee, tea, soda and energy drinks they consumed, as well as filled out twice daily headache reports detailing the onset, duration, intensity, and medications used for migraines since the previous diary entry.

Participants also provided detailed information about other common migraine triggers, including medication use, alcoholic beverage intake, activity levels, depressive symptoms, psychological stress, sleep patterns and menstrual cycles.

To evaluate the link between caffeinated beverage intake and migraine headache on the same day or on the following day, researchers used a self-matched analysis, comparing an individual participant’s incidence of migraines on days with caffeinated beverage intake to that same participant’s incidence of migraines on days with no caffeinated beverage intake.

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The researchers further matched headache incidence by days of the week, eliminating weekend versus week day habits that may also impact migraine occurrence.

Self-matching also allowed for the variations in caffeine dose across different types of beverages and preparations.

“One serving of caffeine is typically defined as eight ounces or one cup of caffeinated coffee, six ounces of tea, a 12-ounce can of soda and a 2-ounce can of an energy drink,” Mostofsky said.

“Those servings contain anywhere from 25 to 150 milligrams of caffeine, so we cannot quantify the amount of caffeine that is associated with heightened risk of migraine. However, in this self-matched analysis over only six weeks, each participant’s choice and preparation of caffeinated beverages should be fairly consistent,” Mostofsky added. (IANS)